Iš Gvildenu svetainės

Mintys: Poreikiai

Žr. Gyvybė

Poreikiai

Yra šeši poreikiai:

Tenkinimai

Aštuoniais dėsniais tenkiname Maslow laipsnyno poreikius:

In order to survive, we cling to what we have. We then want to survive tomorrow as well, so for security, we get more than what we need, which puts distance between us and our need for survival, because we can lose some of what we have, and cling to the rest. Finally, how can we help others survive? We avoid extremes - we don't rock the boat - so that others can cling to what they have. In order to have self-esteem, we choose the good over the bad, as each such choice is the source of our self-esteem. We then want self-esteem tomorrow as well, so we seek this opportunity by choosing the better over the worse. This puts distance between us and our need for self-esteem, because in choosing the better over the worse, both alternatives may be bad, or both may be good, so we don't have to think, just yet, that one is bad and the other is good. Finally, how can we help others find self-esteem? We strive for the best - we are extreme - so that others may readily decide that we are good or bad.

We can observe these six operating principles, and infer from them the needs they address. For example, consider an "altruistic" person. Everything that we can observe will suggest how they are addressing their own needs. If they do good deeds because they "must be done", they address their own survival; if so that they would have done "more good deeds", they address security; if because this is what a "normal person does", they address acceptance; if to do "the right thing", they address self-esteem; if to "make things better" they address opportunity; and if to "seek perfection" they address self-fulfillment. But there are two other principles, which we do not observe in the world, but which we acknowledge in our heart, and which free us from our needs. One is to be perfect, to have no needs, which is the case with God. The other is to take up the needs of another, rather than our own, which is the only way we can ignore our own needs. [11/00, Andrius Kulikauskas]

Maslow observed that we share a hierarchy of needs, which his followers extended. We can organize these as three needs of the body:

and three needs of the mind:

The body seeks to survive. It also seeks security so that it survives tomorrow. Finally, it seeks acceptance (fulfillment of the social need), relevance to the greater context, which is the ultimate reason for surviving. Analogously, the mind has no life, no energy to live, except by its self-esteem (self-worth). It also seeks opportunity (freedom, independence) so that it has self-esteem tomorrow. Finally, it seeks self-fulfillment (life meaning), relevance to the greater context, which is the ultimate reason for self-esteem.

Jėzaus pasisakymai Aš esu. Malonė vietoj teisybės

Renkamės tenkinimus taikyti ryšium su Dievu (Jėzaus pasisakymais "Aš esu") gyventi DievuRinkti malonę vietoj teisybės.

Poreikių tenkinimai: rinkti atvaizdą:

Poreikiai reiškiasi kaip netroškimas nieko, taip pat pasakojime, aštuongubiame kelyje Palaiminimai. Kaip tai siejasi? Ir kaip su kitais lygmenimis?

Dievas kaip viskas

One of the ways that we might conceive God is as everything.

God as everything is self-sufficient.

In order to conceive this, we turn it around. We reinterpre self-sufficiency. We say that everything wishes for nothing. In other words, everything lacks nothing.

Our minds are not able to directly conceive of lacking nothing. There is nothing here for us to conceive! Instead, our mind provides us with a structural context, which is that we can have various needs. Maslow's hierarchy of needs organizes six needs: survival, security, acceptance, self-esteem, opportunity, self-fulfillment. There are eight operating principles for addressing these needs. One of these operating principles is to Be perfect. In other words, Lack nothing, Have no needs.

But we do not wish for nothing. We have needs. So there is a structural framework for our expressing our needs, a hierarchyOfNeeds. There are OperatingPrinciples for addressing these needs.

These principles may be exercised with respect to ourselves, or with respect to God who lacks nothing and is thus greater than us, as in [IAmStatements Jesus of Nazareth's statements, "I Am..."]. In this way, we interpret our needs in terms of the perspective of Everything, we care about Everything.

===God's perspective===

We may apply the operating principles with respect to life or eternal life. This distinguishes between our perspective and God's perspective. In God's perspective, we find a new extended interpretation of the gradation, starting with glory, etc..

The Wishing-for-nothing is expressed by necessary-actual-possible and the Not is the distinction of their being without or within a system.

 without systemwithin system
necessaryglorylove
actualintentwork
possibleexamplecommand

With regard to the good, we get needs:

Each of the needs relates two perspectives. The responses to needs are operating principles which discriminate between the two perspectives, which is from the heart, and which is from the world?

We may think of the gradation of needs as connecting choices of the heart and the world, and thereby providing interpretations for the operating principles in terms of the heart and the world.

For three of the needs (the physical needs) the choices are between accepting them, or thinking of them in terms specifically in terms of the questions whether - what - how, and thereby in terms of the topologies - necessary - actual - possible. This determines whether the operating principles are applied broadly (with regard to God, as in the "I am" questions) or narrowly.

Likewise, for the other three needs, the heart chooses the broader perspective (amongst whether - what - how), so for example, the heart chooses "the good" (the what of self-esteem) over "the bad" (the whether of self-esteem), and "the better" (the how of opportunity) over "the worse" (the whether of opportunity), and "the best" (the how of self-fulfillment) over "the rest" (the what of self-fulfillment). Note that the social need may be thought of as picking out the slack that is above and beyond our own survival needs and is inherent in part of our need for security, the surplus which security builds up is the slack that we can share.

šv.Jono evangelija

Gospel of John

===Andrius: My notes on the Gospel of John===

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/lovingGod/message/56

My notes on the Gospel of John. My own understanding. Andrius, ms@ms.lt

I Am

I am the resurrection and the life

eternal life = to know God the Father and Jesus ("with God") who he has sent

In what sense is God love? and supports life? especially as a onesome? It seems there is a wholeness of the one perspective. That one perspective is the Son, the wholeness is ?

I am the gate for the sheep

I am the way, the truth and the life

What is the Spirit? It is a gift from the Father to the Son. What is this gift? The gift of God is eternal life.

I am the good shepherd

I am the light of the world

truth = the fact that one can give oneself up for others

I am the true vine

I am the bread of life

What is the spirit? That which gives wholeness?

===IAmStatements===

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/lovingGod/message/88

I am working on understanding life, which I pursue mostly at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/consideringGod/ I have been writing my notes in TheBrain. Today I looked over my notes from the Gospel of John, and have been linking and thinking. I'll write down what I'm thinking, maybe somebody will have a thought. Andrius, http://www.ms.lt


I think a lot about Christ's statements "I am..." At the heart of each statement I think there is a different concept, each of which is eternal life.

I'm thinking more about each of these, what they mean, and how they relate to each other. I thought about the gate for the sheep, having life and to the fullest. I think now that the pen is heaven, and that we are saved by entering in, but to live to the fullest we go out to pasture, into the world. We are born again if we choose therefore to go out to the world. If we are in the spirit, then we are like the wind, nobody knows if we are coming or going, in this regard - are we rising above the world, or are we engaging it.

They all seem to speak of eternal life as God's going beyond himself.

I have two thoughts regarding this. One is that God is always connected to us, but we are not always connected to him, and not necessarily for any fault of our own. I have a sense when I have a connection with God, and when I don't. I doubt that we're designed to have connection with God all the time, we're designed to turn our attention over to other things as well. I don't find there being something inherently wrong not to be connected with God, although it often happens that I feel there's something wrong and that I should run to him, and he is there. Certainly Christ had a will distinct from God's, and even at odds with God, although he always chose God over himself. "Don't touch me, for I haven't yet ascended to my Father". I'm thinking about Christ on the cross, and also his temptation in the wilderness. In the latter case, the Spirit was with him. I don't know if the Father was with him or not, I suppose he was, for he prayed. At all these times I expect he prayed, but whether God was with him, I don't know. Also, with the psalm, "God why have you abandoned me?", it's hard to say what level he is reading it on. Is he living it, or is he reading it? If he is living it, then I'd say he's abandoned. If he's just citing it, I think that at least he's sympathetic with the position. If he's sympathetic, I think it's because it's real, and if it's real, I think he suffers this, for this makes his suffering more real, more to the point. The fact that he's abandoned does not diminish God, but rather glorifies him. So certainly he was abandoned.

Another issue, I guess the same issue, is that just as God gives himself up in every way, making way for others, so he has children who do likewise, but he has a Son who he gives up. That is, the Father behaves towards his Son in a way that is above and beyond how he behaves towards himself. The Father gives up himself of his own, but the Son is given up by the Father. That is why there is drama. The Son is always with the Father, but the Father has given up the Son. It is up to the Son to justify the Father. The Son takes up this work from the Father, and thereby glorifies the Father. And the Father has a vested interest that people believe in the Son, for otherwise there is no justification for the Father. So this is the Father's work, to make good of his action towards his Son. For the Son has made good of what the Father has done. The Son makes true the Father - that just as the Father give himself up, so does the Son give himself up, even as the Father has given up the Son.

This outlook intensifies for me what is going on, increases my empathy for the Son, and the glory of the Father. Just as the Father gave up his Son, so he gave over to the Son all things that on him they depend, that he make true the Father.

I add some quotes that may relate.

Andrius

http://www.ms.lt http://www.no-hit.com/andrius/

"I have yet many things to tell you, but you can't bear them now. 16:13 However when he, the Spirit of truth, has come, he will guide you into all truth, for he will not speak from himself; but whatever he hears, he will speak. He will declare to you things that are coming. 16:14 He will glorify me, for he will take from what is mine, and will declare it to you. 16:15 All things whatever the Father has are mine; therefore I said that he takes of mine, and will declare it to you."

"Now my soul is troubled. What shall I say? 'Father, save me from this time?' But for this cause I came to this time. 12:28 Father, glorify your name!"

"Neither did this man sin, nor his parents; but, that the works of God might be revealed in him"

"Most certainly I tell you, everyone who commits sin is the bondservant of sin. 8:35 A bondservant doesn't live in the house forever. A son remains forever. 8:36 If therefore the Son makes you free, you will be free indeed."

"Yet I am not alone, because the Father is with me."

"You would have no power at all against me, unless it were given to you from above. Therefore he who delivered me to you has greater sin."

===Jesus' statementes "I Am..."===

The gospel of John contains eight statements by Christ of the form "I am...", the eighth being "I AM", alluding to Jahwe, the name God revealed to Moses. 0. I am. 1. I am the resurrection and the life. 2. I am the gate for the sheep. 3. I am the way, the truth and the life. 4. I am the good shepherd. 5. I am the light of the world. 6. I am the true vine. 7. I am the bread of life. They express how we may apply our operating principles absolutely - with respect to God, the entirety - rather than relatively, with respect to ourselves.

These statements question the logic of our concern for ourselves. They embolden us to live our lives with respect to the entirety. They challenge us to live with faith with regard to the entirety. When I read the gospel of John, I think he was the disciple very close to Christ, who cared to note how Christ himself thought about these things. [11/00, Andrius Kulikauskas]

===Notes===

I learned of the statements from AdrianHunter.

{{Andrius}}: One thing I noticed is that "eternal life" is identified with the glory of God, and also the intention of God. So I imagine that it might be identified with all of the following:

- - glory of God - intention of God - example of God - love of God - work of God - command of God - will of God

These come up in Christ's "I am..." statements in the Gospel of John. So I should think and write about that.


[http://groups.yahoo.com/group/livingbytruth/message/276 March 3, 2003]

Hi David,

Thank you for your most recent letter. I wrote a reply, but didn't send it out, and have lost it somewhere. I don't know what to say regarding the problem of how all such knowledge might be misused. I just think that it's fair to expect God to take care of a lot of this. Certainly if we ourselves are proceeding in good will, so that's always important to check. Also, my feeling and experience is that the truly deep knowledge is available only through our purity of heart, our clarity of purpose. So that in itself is a check on misuse. Finally, how can we know that hesitating is any better than pursuing?

I started reorganizing my notes at http://www.ms.lt/def/outline.html and hit upon a better sense of the overview. I'll write about that here. And I've started to work with Personal Brain on this, so I hope to make that available in the coming weeks.

I had noticed how the unfolding of everything was based upon the divisions, and their role in making definitions. So that is how everything starts out. Now what I've noticed is that there are a lot of very important facts about life that have to do with the upshot of life, how it concludes. It's very helpful to separate these out. I've realized that they are all about the coherence of everything, rather than the unfolding of everything. I think they are organized by the "I am..." statements of Jesus, and they can be considered in reverse order, so that each expresses coherence with fewer and fewer perspectives, getting down to the core essence of life, which has zero perspectives, and is God, "I AM". Perfection, I suppose. I imagine that this is related to the outlook that you've been expressing.

So here is a sketch of what I think are the core outlooks that express the essence of life, by which it coheres. Consider life as having unfolded from everything by means of an operation +1, which contributes definitions by means of the division of everything. The eight divisions yield four primary structures and six secondary structures that express all of life. But do they all cohere? Now there are eight outlooks that don't collapse life, but rather, allow it to hold together. They are perhaps related by an operation -1, which describes what is good. Jesus talks about them through his "I am..." statements, which I write more about at http://www.ms.lt/def/17.html and have to do with the fact that God has no needs, lacks nothing, is perfect, but we have needs, and can respond to them with operating principles, and apply them to look towards God.

Jesus says, "I am the bread of life", which is about looking to God's will rather than our own. Taking up the needs of others, rather than our own. "This is my flesh", he said of the bread he gave, because the only thing that had kept the bread from becoming his flesh was that he gave the bread to others that it become their flesh. "This is my blood" he said of the wine. The first outlook is the fact of life itself, that it is a gift. This is the fact that life is unquestionably good. This is related to the will, and how it brings together the expressions of the will, only if they look to the whole. I think it somehow brings together seven perspectives, and occurs through the seventh members of the injections of the primary structures.

Jesus says, "I am the true vine", which is about looking to God's command. I have a need for self-fulfillment, and so I strive for perfection. If I wish to do so absolutely, then I do so with respect to the command of the entirety, which gives absolute fruit. "If ye abide in me, and my words abide in you, ye shall ask what ye will, and it shall be done unto you." This brings together the six ways of expressing "Love your neighbor as yourself", and also redundantly, positively the four ways of expressing "Love God". Instead of living directly, in a scattered manner (7 perspectives), we can focus on the commandments (6 perspectives).

Jesus says, "I am the light of the world", which is about looking to God's work. I have a need for opportunity, and so I choose the better over the worse. If I wish to do so absolutely, then I do so with respect to the works of the entirety, which give its absolute message. "I must work the works of him that sent me, while it is day: the night cometh, when no man can work. As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world." God is a creator, that is his work. We are children of God in that we do what he does, we are cocreators. We remake the world by choosing the truth of the heart over the truth of the world, and thereby creating a community of the truth of the heart. Instead of focusing on the commandments (6 perspectives), we can focus on being cocreators (5 perspectives).

Jesus says, "I am the good shepherd", which is about looking to God's love. I have a need for self-worth, and so I choose the good over the bad. If I wish to do so absolutely, then I do so with respect to the love of the entirety, the source of absolute value. "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life." We can "love our enemy" as believers in God, who are able to have an enemy but nevertheless love them. To love our enemy is to behave with them just as we would with our friends. Jesus says our friends are those who understand our commands and follow them, our servants do not understand our commands but follow them, and I suppose that our enemies do not follow our commands, the bigger ones understanding them, the smaller ones not. So we can behave to all the same, as God who sends his rain on the good and the bad, and his sun likewise. We give up our life for our friends, and the principles of our friendship. Our friendship is based on openness. Instead of focusing on cocreation (5 perspectives), we can focus on behaving as friends (4 perspectives).

Jesus says, "I am the way, the truth and the life", which is about looking to God's example. I have a need for acceptance, and so I avoid extremes, I behave normally. If I wish to do so absolutely, then I do so with respect to the example of the entirety, which provides an absolute home. "If a man love me, he will keep my words: and my Father will love him, and we will come unto him, and make our abode with him." We can take up God's concerns by obeying - doing as he says, believing - following one who does as he says, or caring - wanting to go in the direction that he does. In this way we do God's will. Instead of focusing on behaving as friends (4 perspectives), we focus on pursuing his concerns (3 perspectives).

Jesus says, "I am the gate for the sheep", which is about looking to God's intention. I have a need for security, and so I get more than what I need. If I wish to do so absolutely, then I do so with respect to the intention of the entirety, which gives absolute salvation. Not only blessed within the gate, but blessed to go out and come back. "I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly." We can rise above life, but also engage it. Instead of focusing on pursuing God's concerns (3 perspectives), we focus on reaching out (2 perspectives).

Jesus says, "I am the resurrection and the life", which is about looking to God's glory. I have a need for life, and so I cling to what we have. If I wish to do so absolutely, then I do so with respect to the glory of the entirety, which gives absolute life. Not only to live, but to overcome death. "Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour: but for this cause came I unto this hour. Father, glorify thy name." We can simply love, whether or not we are in the world or above it, connected to God or on our own, whether or not God exists. In this sense, God is love. Instead of focusing on reaching out (2 perspectives), we focus on loving (1 perspective).

Jesus say, "I AM", which is about looking to God. How can I have no needs, and be perfect? Only with respect to the entirety. Rather than love (1 perspective), we can simply look to God (0 perspectives).


{{Andrius}}: [http://groups.yahoo.com/group/livingbytruth/message/346 July 24, 2003]

Yesterday I was analyzing Jesus' "I am..." statements from the Gospel of John. I sent that to our group http://groups.yahoo.com/group/lovingGod/ and I include it at the end of my letter. At the core of each of these statements is a concept that expresses eternal life as God's going beyond himself.

Today I considered, in each case, what is going beyond?

(not only God has coherence, but so does everything)

(we are "born again" when we choose to go out in the world and engage it)

(as the Father does, so does the Son - he comes from above)

(the Father gave himself up, made way for everything, of his own will - but he likewise gives up his Son, who is sent of his Father's will, not his own)

(the Father is justified if truly the Son likewise gives himself up, and there is belief that the Father and the Son are one)

(as the Father makes way for the Son, and the Son makes way for the Father, so the Son makes way for us to make way for each other)

(the drama of the justification of the Father's giving up his Son is to come across regardless of how one comes to see and believe)

There seems to be an operation +2 here, where God's X+2 is that God's X go beyond him. That might make sense if it could be related to expectations and emotional responses.

I will try to think more about the big picture, maybe this will help.

Peace,

Andrius

Andrius Kulikauskas Minciu Sodas http://www.ms.lt ms@ms.lt Velenje, Slovenia

I am working on understanding life, which I pursue mostly at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/consideringGod/ I have been writing my notes in TheBrain. Today I looked over my notes from the Gospel of John, and have been linking and thinking. I'll write down what I'm thinking, maybe somebody will have a thought. Andrius, http://www.ms.lt


I think a lot about Christ's statements "I am..." At the heart of each statement I think there is a different concept, each of which is eternal life.

I'm thinking more about each of these, what they mean, and how they relate to each other. I thought about the gate for the sheep, having life and to the fullest. I think now that the pen is heaven, and that we are saved by entering in, but to live to the fullest we go out to pasture, into the world. We are born again if we choose therefore to go out to the world. If we are in the spirit, then we are like the wind, nobody knows if we are coming or going, in this regard - are we rising above the world, or are we engaging it.

God's glory is his Word, the Son, the coherence of everything, the Godness of everything, that through which everything arises. God's intention is to be worshipped in spirit and truth, that we have life and to the fullest, rising above the world but also engaging it. God's example comes from above, from heaven, to show how to do, that it might be done, for the glory of the one above. God's love is that his Son (the one who does what the Father does) is always with him, but he is not always with his Son, so that just as he gives himself up, so he gives up his Son, so that his Son might give himself up. God's work is to believe the Son that he sent, and accept that he is from God, does God's work for the glory of God. And I think, to believe that God is loving even in giving up his Son, that he is truly God in doing so. God's command is to love each other, give oneself up for those who love each other, make way for each other to give oneself up. God's will is that every one who sees the Son and believes in him have eternal life. Eternal life is to do the work of God that the Son allows us to complete through the Holy Spirit, this work of giving way for each other.

They all seem to speak of eternal life as God's going beyond himself.

I have two thoughts regarding this. One is that God is always connected to us, but we are not always connected to him, and not necessarily for any fault of our own. I have a sense when I have a connection with God, and when I don't. I doubt that we're designed to have connection with God all the time, we're designed to turn our attention over to other things as well. I don't find there being something inherently wrong not to be connected with God, although it often happens that I feel there's something wrong and that I should run to him, and he is there. Certainly Christ had a will distinct from God's, and even at odds with God, although he always chose God over himself. "Don't touch me, for I haven't yet ascended to my Father". I'm thinking about Christ on the cross, and also his temptation in the wilderness. In the latter case, the Spirit was with him. I don't know if the Father was with him or not, I suppose he was, for he prayed. At all these times I expect he prayed, but whether God was with him, I don't know. Also, with the psalm, "God why have you abandoned me?", it's hard to say what level he is reading it on. Is he living it, or is he reading it? If he is living it, then I'd say he's abandoned. If he's just citing it, I think that at least he's sympathetic with the position. If he's sympathetic, I think it's because it's real, and if it's real, I think he suffers this, for this makes his suffering more real, more to the point. The fact that he's abandoned does not diminish God, but rather glorifies him. So certainly he was abandoned.

Another issue, I guess the same issue, is that just as God gives himself up in every way, making way for others, so he has children who do likewise, but he has a Son who he gives up. That is, the Father behaves towards his Son in a way that is above and beyond how he behaves towards himself. The Father gives up himself of his own, but the Son is given up by the Father. That is why there is drama. The Son is always with the Father, but the Father has given up the Son. It is up to the Son to justify the Father. The Son takes up this work from the Father, and thereby glorifies the Father. And the Father has a vested interest that people believe in the Son, for otherwise there is no justification for the Father. So this is the Father's work, to make good of his action towards his Son. For the Son has made good of what the Father has done. The Son makes true the Father - that just as the Father give himself up, so does the Son give himself up, even as the Father has given up the Son.

This outlook intensifies for me what is going on, increases my empathy for the Son, and the glory of the Father. Just as the Father gave up his Son, so he gave over to the Son all things that on him they depend, that he make true the Father.

I add some quotes that may relate.

Andrius

http://www.ms.lt http://www.no-hit.com/andrius/

"I have yet many things to tell you, but you can't bear them now. 16:13 However when he, the Spirit of truth, has come, he will guide you into all truth, for he will not speak from himself; but whatever he hears, he will speak. He will declare to you things that are coming. 16:14 He will glorify me, for he will take from what is mine, and will declare it to you. 16:15 All things whatever the Father has are mine; therefore I said that he takes of mine, and will declare it to you."

"Now my soul is troubled. What shall I say? 'Father, save me from this time?' But for this cause I came to this time. 12:28 Father, glorify your name!"

"Neither did this man sin, nor his parents; but, that the works of God might be revealed in him"

"Most certainly I tell you, everyone who commits sin is the bondservant of sin. 8:35 A bondservant doesn't live in the house forever. A son remains forever. 8:36 If therefore the Son makes you free, you will be free indeed."

"Yet I am not alone, because the Father is with me."

"You would have no power at all against me, unless it were given to you from above. Therefore he who delivered me to you has greater sin."

Interpoliavimas tarp Dievo ir gerumo

See also {{Structure}}, RequirementsOfLivingSystems, RepresentationsOfEverything, RepresentationsOfAnything, {{Gradation}}


Perhaps the way to consider structure is as an interpolation between the representations of everything, and the representations of anything.

They are perhaps related primarily with the Eightfold way, and have to do with obeying, believing, caring - doing God's will.


The Conditions for Structure

Gradation expresses the development of the conditions for structure. A whole series of conditions unfold from the activity of everything. These are conditions for the structure expressing the connection between everything (the nullsome) and anything (the onesome).

The sixsome is the condition for structure, and onesome is the condition for system. The gradation is in this way also the interpolation between the nullsome and the sevensome, between spirit without system and spirit within system. Nullsome, onesome, twosome, threesome have four representations. Foursome, fivesome, sixsome, sevensome have two representations. The goodness of God is in the connection of these coherencies. Any kind of spirit within the system arises from spirit without the system. The spirit, in going into any system, is its spirit.

Jėzaus 8 pamokymai

Ką randi, tą myli... ir t.t.

Kūnas

Disembodying mind. Lakoff visiškai apversti.

Hofstatder pavyzdys iš jo kalbos apie analogijas, Stanford universitete: kaip jo dukrytės nusivylimas jam primenė, kaip jisai vaikystėje nusivylė, kai sužinojo, kad x1, x2... nieko ypatingo nereiškia. Tai parodo, kad prisiminimų akstinas nėra (būtinai) kūniškas, o prisiminimas pagrįstas santykiais, schemomis, sandaromis.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hofstede%27s_cultural_dimensions_theory sieti su poreikių tenkinimais

Kūno poreikiais esame įsitraukę ir įsikabinę į atsakymą, o dvasios poreikiais esame atsipalaidavę ir renkamės teiginį ar neiginį.

Hofstede

Parsiųstas iš http://www.ms.lt/sodas/Mintys/Poreikiai
Puslapis paskutinį kartą pakeistas 2019 gegužės 29 d., 22:28