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Andrius Kulikauskas

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Book.Draft-ExpectingWhatWeDontWish istorija

Paslėpti nežymius pakeitimus - Rodyti galutinio teksto pakeitimus

2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 19:59 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Ištrintos 0-101 eilutės:
Accepted for [[http://www.flfi.ut.ee/en/conference-emotions | Emotions: Rationality, Morality and Social Understanding]], Tartu, Estonia, September 7-9, 2017.

[++Expecting What We Don't Wish:++]

[++The Source of Anger, Hate, Relief and Depression.++]

Attach:EWWDW-01.png

I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. From this model it will become apparent that the purpose of our emotional life is to help us understand our expectations, engage them and learn from them. First, I will show how the consequences of our expectations give rise to a set of basic emotions by which we distinguish our self and our world. This yields a map of an emotional manifold which we navigate and transform to define and redefine ourselves. Next, I will explore how our morality arises from our expectations about our expectations, and especially, our fundamental wish to consider us all as one self living in different worlds, rather than as different selves living in one world. In particular, we experience healthy emotions, including sadness, when we expect what we wish, but unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show that by studying poems we can learn how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.

Attach:EWWDW-02.jpg

A first step is to model our most basic emotional responses. I started with six responses which are essentially those which psychologist Paul Ekman found can be observed in the faces of young infants, namely: happiness, sadness, excitement, surprise, fright and disgust. What is the simplest way that I might evoke these responses within myself? I once read that we are struck by existential sadness when our deeply held assumptions turn out to be wrong. So I imagined myself as a child playing with alphabet blocks. I would pick up a block, guess what letter was on the other side, and see if I was right.

Attach:EWWDW-03.png

Suppose I don't know the block very well. If I guess wrong, then I am surprised, but if I guess right, then I am excited. However, if I know the block with absolute certainty, if I can't imagine I could be wrong, if my self and my world depend on that, and yet indeed I am wrong, then I feel devastated, but if I am right, I feel content and assured. And so by such introspection it is clear that our cognition grounds our emotion. A crucial distinction is between that knowledge which we personally identify with, by which we define ourselves, and that knowledge which is more distant, exploratory, theoretical. Furthermore, when I experience what I can't in any way expect because it is too sudden, too strange or too undesireable, then if it comes from beyond, I am frightened, and if it comes from within, I feel disgusted.

Attach:EWWDW-04.png

The structure of this model gives subjective meaning to the facial expressions we observe. It also makes sense of two emotional responses which we can introspect but which we do not and cannot observe, namely peace and suspense. We feel suspense after we have made an expectation and before we know whether it has been met, and we feel peace when we make no expectations. These are responses of not knowing, whereas the other six are for knowing. We see from this model that seeking peace (which has us be sensitive to all emotions) and seeking happiness (by avoiding sadness) are two very different approaches to living.

Attach:EWWDW-05.jpg

We can thus evoke distinct, basic, pure, vivid emotional responses by manipulating abstract expectations. It is remarkable that psychologists have not appreciated the significance of our imagination's ability to evoke feelings. They focus on physiology and conclude that there are no basic emotions, indeed, no reproducible emotions, because they lack any consistent expression. It is as if they were linguists for whom shouting and whispering were different activities and who never understood that they may convey the same name. It is as if they thought that the principles of mathematics are somewhere to be found in the particulars of a computer's hardware and software implementation of addition and subtraction. They do not appreciate the mind as an abstract system of activity which maintains a coherence that need not have any particular neurological analogue.

Neurologists such as Panksepp point to particular emotional systems, which he termed FEAR, RAGE, LUST, CARE, GRIEF/PANIC, PLAY and SEEKING. It makes sense that these disparate systems developed to serve specific evolutionary purposes. However, neurologists and psychologists have not recognized that our mind experiences a single emotional manifold which integrates distinct emotional systems, just as it has a sensory manifold which integrates vision, sound and touch. They don't consider the system as a whole, and so they aren't aware of externally nonobservable feelings such as peace and suspense, but are instead prone to making dubious claims about particular feelings. Thus Panksepp imagines that rats in the SEEKING mode are experiencing euphoria because they choose that state to the point of death by exhaustion, and yet it seems much more likely that the rats are feeling suspense, which even at low levels can keep humans playing video games interminably. And Panksepp claims that happiness is the evolutionary goal of life. But if we realize that happiness is just a symptom, then it becomes meaningful instead to seek peace so that we gain wisdom from being sensitive to the feedback of a variety of feelings.

Attach:EWWDW-06.jpg

The typical 2x2 models which psychologists do appeal to are based on continuous variations, as if they were spectrums of sounds or colors. Such continuous models are completely inappropriate for supporting an emotional language because there lack features for drawing distinctions. A language must be based on structural distinctions as we have with musical scales or phonetic contrasts. Psychologists have thus not recognized that feelings derive from our expectations, whether we can make them or not, whether they are met or not. Psychologists are not aware that the central theme of our emotional language is drawing a distinction between our self and our world.

We are able to compare our many feelings as if they belonged to the same system. This suggests that our brains have a neurological map of our emotional system just as our brains have maps of our body. But the reality of this manifold is not in any particular map but in the fact that a feeling is located in the same place on that map whether we simply imagine it or whether tears fall from our eyes as we experience it. Similarly, a word is the same whether we hear it in our minds or we speak it with our vocal chords.

Attach:EWWDW-07.jpg

Next, I explain how a moral dimension arises when we make expectations about our expectations, for example, when we judge that our expectations will likely not be met and thus we become anxious that we will be sad. Negative moral tones arise when we expect that which we do not wish. Reflecting on this discord, our suspense becomes anxiety. If our suspicions are confirmed, then we feel hate (rather than sadness) and anger (rather than surprise). If our suspicions are refuted, then we feel relief (rather than excitement) and depression (rather than happiness). For example, if I expected to find my bicycle where I left it, then I will be surprised if I don't; but if I expected it to be stolen, then I will be angry if it is, but relieved if it is not. If I expect my sweetheart is true, then I will be distraught if she is not; but if I expect her to be unfaithful, then I will feel hate if she is unfaithful, and if rather she is not unfaithful, then I will feel depressed because I have meanwhile invested myself in a mistress who I do not care for. Similarly, if I turn my back on my dream of becoming a movie director, and I commit myself to working in a factory in Ireland, then I will feel depressed, entrenched and incapacitated if I do have the chance of going to film school. We thus find that depression occurs precisely when we could have been happy (because what we wanted to expect actually happened) but instead we feel incapacitated (because we wrongly expected what we did not want).

Attach:EWWDW-08.jpg

We feel positive moral tones as the impossibility of negative moral tones. For example, if we only expect what we truly wish for, then we feel love as the impossibility of hate. If we perceive that everything is outside of us, then disgust is impossible, and so we feel beauty. If we perceive that everything is within us, then fright is impossible, and so we feel intimacy. Thus we feel love, beauty and intimacy not as our own emotional responses, but rather as afterglows, emanating from our environment - loving, beautiful, intimate.

Attach:EWWDW-09.jpg

Our expectations are essential as we learn in life: taking a stand, following through and reflecting. Our feelings give us feedback on our learning. Ar we being, doing and thinking correctly? When we are being as we should, then our expectations match our wishes, and so we are sensitive, but otherwise insensitive. When we are doing as we should, then we are meeting our expectations, and so we are feeling positive, but otherwise negative. And when we are thinking as we should, then we have let go of our expectations, we are not prejudiced by our selves and our world, and we feel at peace, not riled. Thus we can embrace our expectations to inhabit our selves and be sensitive in our world, we can respond wholeheartedly, and we can then let go of our expectations to be at peace and think fresh.

Attach:EWWDW-10.png

Our emotional life allows us to consider our selves in this world. Who do we take ourselves to be? Are we all simply one and the same being who inhabits a variety of worlds? Or are we a variety of beings together in the same world? Accordingly, do I choose to live as a person-in-general doing what any good person ought to do? Or do I choose to live as a person-in-particular and focus on what is specific to me? Our emotional life frames this fundamental moral choice by allowing us to identify our self with all or with one.

I find it helpful to contrast us, in conditions, with God, beyond conditions. This unconditional God wishes for conditional good. God wishes for nothing - is self-sufficient - but we have bodies with needs; God wishes for something - is certain - but we have minds with doubts; God wishes for anything - is calm - but we have hearts with expectations; God wishes for everything - is loving - but we have wills with values. In general, God lives by not knowing but simply wishing - and similarly, we don't know what we should be doing in life - but we are creatures of expecting and knowing, and we do know when we go astray. Our paradoxical challenge in life is to focus on that knowledge - our own personal deepest value in life - which directs us on that path of not knowing but wishing. Our body, mind, heart and will offer, in the form of pleasure, that image of what is desirable, but it is only an image, just as we might see ourselves in a mirror, and even our own self is but an image. Likewise, pain is but an image of what is undesirable. We are free to dedicate ourselves to our personal pleasure. We are free to transform or even ignore our sense of pleasure and pain. We are free to identify with a God who has taken up our conditions but is truly beyond them. We are free who we choose to take ourselves to be.

Attach:EWWDW-11.png

What do we truly want? We can study our feelings to infer what our expectations must be. I studied Jesus's emotional responses in the Gospel of Mark to deduce Jesus's expectation that we all are one. I imagine that we all wish to live one with God and all. We are sad to be one with nobody, surprised to be one with somebody, excited to be one with anybody and happy to be one with everybody.

Attach:EWWDW-12.png

The moral distinction between an inclusive self and an exclusive self is evident in emotional responses arising from expectations about expectations.

An inclusive self naturally honors each individual as the best interpreter of their own expectations. Feelings of self-assuredness, guilt and humility are healthy in that they ignore outside views and assert our own internal rationale for what it means for us to meet or fail to meet our expectations for ourselves or not to be able to make such expectations at all.

In contrast, pride, shame and resignation are accepted or imposed from an external point of view. Inducing and embracing these feelings is empty and sinful in that they do not foster self-knowledge and self-governance but instead subject one to the whims of society. Yet people often accept such externally defined feelings, perhaps because they are less intense in their accountability than internally defined feelings.

Attach:EWWDW-15.png

Both empathy and sympathy have us honor another person's expectations. However, empathy has us feel the same emotions because we place ourselves in the same shoes - we draw the same relevant distinctions between the self and the world. Indeed, empathy has us expand our own sense of self so that we identify more broadly. Instead of feeling surprised that somebody died, we feel sad with their children that they did. As our self grows, our life feels ever more personal and serious.

In contrast, humor is a strategy that has us escape sadness by shrinking ourselves. What was sad is simply surprising when we put some distance on it. This disappearance of sadness is what feels funny and makes us laugh. If sadness is hard to bear, and we seek to avoid it, then humor is much better than hate. However, sadness is a healthy emotion, and humor for its own sake easily veers into hate.

Attach:EWWDW-16.png

Our self is what we know, and our world is what we don't. We are destined to grow forever by expressing what we don't know in terms of what we know. If we listen to our feelings, then we can grow aware of ourselves and learn that our expectations are not exactly what we want and we can adjust them accordingly.

Thus we step out of ourselves, and think rationally, by letting go of our personal prejudices, biases, and self-interests, and then finding a sense of peace from which we can best adjust ourselves, who we should be. Then we can step into ourselves and lock in our expectations so that we authentically learn from them by taking a stand, following through and reflecting. If we internalize justice as obedience, loyalty as belief, and duty as caring, then we will objectively transform our souls, as if tuning ourselves as musical instruments, so that the positive moral tones of beauty, love and intimacy, will resound in us as virtues: courage, hope and honesty.

Attach:EWWDW-14.png

Our emotional responses can thus serve as cues for us to get things done with others. Here are some initial maxims which I and Joe Damal came up with as community organizers in Chicago and which play with the sense in which we are all one: when happy - delegate, excited - initiate, surprised - articulate, sad - renew, frightened - confront, disgusted - make ourselves heard, in suspense - exercise sheer will, and at peace - respond.

Attach:EWWDW-17.png

Psychologists only distinguish between good moods and bad moods. But let us now investigate how our expectations can give rise to a language of thousands of moods. We might study music, dreams, activities, but especially, poetry. Are two people able to interpret a poem in the same way so that it evokes the same mood?

Quiet Night Thoughts, by Chinese poet Li Bai of the Tang Dynasty, is a classic poem about his travels far from home.

Beyond the bed - bright moon shines -
I think on the ground is frost.
I raise my head - see bright moon,
I lower my head - think of home.

Note how this poem organizes the spaces for our expectations. The bed is a boundary beyond which we feel the moon is beautiful and the frost is surprising. The poet's neck, which raises and lowers his head, is yet another boundary. The poet thinks of home, which is dear to him, and of itself that surely makes him happy. Yet when he contemplates that his home is so distant, it is sad to think that he is here and not there. Overall, we can specify a mood of conditional sadness, which depends on his reflection on his great distance from his happiness, as measured by the beauty of the moon and the surprise of the frost.

Attach:EWWDW-19.png

I made a study of 37 classic four-line wujue poems from the Tang dynasty. Each poem made use of one of six different transformations of the boundary that defines the self and world which are familiar to geometers: reflection, shear, rotation, dilation, squeeze and translation. These transformations are six ways of enriching a geometry. In the simplest affine geometry, a triangle consists of three paths from A to B to C. In a projective geometry, it consists of lines intersecting at A and B and C. In a conformal geometry, it is formed by angles at A and B and C. And in a symplectic geometry, it is an oriented area defined by A and B and C. A reflection allows us to look back upon ourselves. A shear transformation lets our view be perpendicular to that of another who sees what we don't see. A rotation lets our view dance from point to point. A dilation has our view expand it, whereas a squeeze transformation has it keep the same area but recast the proportions of its shape. A translation has us move to a new situation. I simply wish to suggest that conceptual geometry is the key to an interpretation of the situations which define the boundary between our selves and our world which determines our mood.

We are usually not consciously aware of our expectations but our emotions make us aware of them at the relevant time. By listening to our moods we can tease apart our expectations and transform negative ones into positive ones so that in every way we expect what we truly wish. We grow more sensitive and also our principles prove more sound. Whereas those who escape their moods, for example, by turning to cigarettes, alcohol or drugs, are evidently stunting themselves.

We often don't know why we feel the way we do. It's often not clear if we are responsible for our mood or if it is simply random. Yet it seems healthy to listen to our moods and try to learn from them, to groom our feelings, to tune ourselves like musical instruments. It seems that our unconscious mind challenges our conscious mind by showing what its principles look like under the light of a variety of different moods. This way we don't have to learn everything from experience. This seems to be the purpose of our moods. A Chinese poet's principles may lead him to journey to some distant province and yet his moods may have him question himself.

I invite us to work together to analyze hundreds of poems and discover a geometry of moods.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 09:55 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 83-93 eilutės iš

''We are usually not consciously aware of our expectations but our emotions make
us relevant of them at the relevant time.''

''Listening
to our moods. Drugs as substitutes to moods.''

These convert spatal boundary into time.

Psychologists do not believe that we experience a language of thousands of moods which ... They only know of good moods and bad moods...

Let us now investigate how our expectations can give rise to
thousands of moods. We might study music, dreams, activities, but especially, poetry. Are two people able to interpret a poem in the same way so that it evokes the same mood?
į:
Psychologists only distinguish between good moods and bad moods. But let us now investigate how our expectations can give rise to a language of thousands of moods. We might study music, dreams, activities, but especially, poetry. Are two people able to interpret a poem in the same way so that it evokes the same mood?
Pakeistos 96-109 eilutės iš
http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/10-Beatles.png

This example suggests that we can specify moods in terms of geometry. In this case, the geometry is simple, like a vector pointing from his head. It could be more sophisticated if he looked back and forth upon himself
, as if on a line, extending in two directions. We can add other people with their expectations, which may be parallel or perpendicular, at angles to each other. We might imagine them sweeping out areas or volumes with their changing expectations. Consider the Beatles' song, She Loves You:

You think you've lost your love.
Well, I saw her yesterday.
It's you she's thinking of,
And she told me what to say,
She says she loves you
...

The very first line lets
us imagine that the boy was happy to be in love, and sad to have lost his love. The singer establishes an intimacy from which he further layers expectations and increases suspense with an intermingling of fright or even disgust: Where did he see her? What does she think of me? What did she tell him to say? The singer frames the boy as depressed, makes him reflect upon himself, and from there reorients him through a dizzy crescendo of feelings: relief, then surprise, then excitement and happiness. If we stop here, then the overall mood is an acceleration into exhilaration. But this could be extended by a sadness that they are not together, or as the song later suggests, complicated by an anger and hatred inasmuch as he came to expect her to leave him, confounded by a depression that he had lost hope, and then perhaps a second anger at her and a third anger at himself that he must now let go of his bad expectations.

By listening to our moods we can tease apart our expectations and transform negative ones into positive ones so that in every way we expect what we truly wish. We grow more sensitive and also our principles prove more sound. Whereas those who escape their moods, for example, by turning to cigarettes, alcohol or drugs, are evidently stunting themselves.
į:
I made a study of 37 classic four-line wujue poems from the Tang dynasty. Each poem made use of one of six different transformations of the boundary that defines the self and world which are familiar to geometers: reflection, shear, rotation, dilation, squeeze and translation. These transformations are six ways of enriching a geometry. In the simplest affine geometry, a triangle consists of three paths from A to B to C. In a projective geometry, it consists of lines intersecting at A and B and C. In a conformal geometry, it is formed by angles at A and B and C. And in a symplectic geometry, it is an oriented area defined by A and B and C. A reflection allows us to look back upon ourselves. A shear transformation lets our view be perpendicular to that of another who sees what we don't see. A rotation lets our view dance from point to point. A dilation has our view expand it, whereas a squeeze transformation has it keep the same area but recast the proportions of its shape. A translation has us move to a new situation. I simply wish to suggest that conceptual geometry is the key to an interpretation of the situations which define the boundary between our selves and our world which determines our mood.

We are usually not consciously aware of our expectations but our emotions make us aware of them at the relevant time.
By listening to our moods we can tease apart our expectations and transform negative ones into positive ones so that in every way we expect what we truly wish. We grow more sensitive and also our principles prove more sound. Whereas those who escape their moods, for example, by turning to cigarettes, alcohol or drugs, are evidently stunting themselves.
Pakeistos 102-104 eilutės iš
I invite us to work together to analyze hundreds of poems and discover a geometry of moods.

''Compare with Gregory Currie's talk about how literature evokes our emotional responses''
į:
I invite us to work together to analyze hundreds of poems and discover a geometry of moods.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 09:34 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 73-84 eilutės iš
Our self is what we know, and our world is what we don't. We are destined to grow forever by expressing what we don't know in terms of what we know. Thus we step out of ourselves, and think rationally, by letting go of our personal prejudices, biases, and self-interests, and then finding a sense of peace from which we can best adjust ourselves, who we should be. Then we can step into ourselves and lock in our expectations so that we live them authentically by taking a stand, following through and reflecting. The external perspectives

''virtues of not knowing: humor is the hope (overcoming sadness) in not knowing - not knowing is shrinking of knowing''



'''Sixsome'''

'''How
we emotionally cling to our beliefs - so they won't change - and rationally can let go of our believes. Stepping in and stepping out.'''

If we listen to our feelings, then we can grow aware of
ourselves and learn that our expectations are not exactly what we want and we can adjust them accordingly. I think that we grow aware of this by stepping into ourselves and stepping out of ourselves. In doing so, we discover our selves to consist of complicated expectations which we have constructed over our lives. They include what we think we know of justice, loyalty and duty. It is vital that we take our principles to heart, internalize them, in which case we sense our own will but also a greater will, beyond our circumstances, I say God's will, with which we align, for we obey not knowing why, we believe not knowing how, we care not knowing what. Upon thus stepping into ourselves, we may sense ourselves surrounded by positive moral tones of love, beauty and intimacy, which are like moods in that they engulf us, and indeed, like canvases for moods because they may last for hours or days, long enough for us to step out of our old expectations. We define ourselves on those canvases in terms of new expectations thanks to the virtues of hope, which looks forward, courage, which holds firm, and honesty, which looks back.
į:
Our self is what we know, and our world is what we don't. We are destined to grow forever by expressing what we don't know in terms of what we know. If we listen to our feelings, then we can grow aware of ourselves and learn that our expectations are not exactly what we want and we can adjust them accordingly.

Thus
we step out of ourselves, and think rationally, by letting go of our personal prejudices, biases, and self-interests, and then finding a sense of peace from which we can best adjust ourselves, who we should be. Then we can step into ourselves and lock in our expectations so that we authentically learn from them by taking a stand, following through and reflecting. If we internalize justice as obedience, loyalty as belief, and duty as caring, then we will objectively transform our souls, as if tuning ourselves as musical instruments, so that the positive moral tones of beauty, love and intimacy, will resound in us as virtues: courage, hope and honesty.
Pakeistos 79-84 eilutės iš
'''Getting things done - foster oneness'''

Our emotional responses invite
us to get things done with others: when happy - delegate, excited - initiate, surprised - articulate, sad - renew, frightened - confront, disgusted - make ourselves heard, in suspense - exercise sheer will, and at peace - respond. However, our feelings are generally much more complicated and so are our expectations as to who we truly are.
į:
Our emotional responses can thus serve as cues for us to get things done with others. Here are some initial maxims which I and Joe Damal came up with as community organizers in Chicago and which play with the sense in which we are all one: when happy - delegate, excited - initiate, surprised - articulate, sad - renew, frightened - confront, disgusted - make ourselves heard, in suspense - exercise sheer will, and at peace - respond.

Attach:EWWDW-17.png
Ištrintos 92-93 eilutės:

Attach:EWWDW-17.png
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 09:25 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 73-74 eilutės iš
Our self is what we know, and our world is what we don't.
į:
Our self is what we know, and our world is what we don't. We are destined to grow forever by expressing what we don't know in terms of what we know. Thus we step out of ourselves, and think rationally, by letting go of our personal prejudices, biases, and self-interests, and then finding a sense of peace from which we can best adjust ourselves, who we should be. Then we can step into ourselves and lock in our expectations so that we live them authentically by taking a stand, following through and reflecting. The external perspectives
Pakeista 77 eilutė iš:
''define rationality as not thinking in terms of one's self - one's prejudices, biases, self-interests - letting go - and as emotion as introducing the self''
į:
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 09:15 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 69-74 eilutės iš
In contrast, humor is a strategy that has us escape sadness by shrinking ourselves.

'''Change in the boundary of the self'''

''shrinking of our self - humor; expansion of our self - seriousness but also empathy. Humor is an a form of sadness avoidance which
is an alternative to hatred.''
į:
In contrast, humor is a strategy that has us escape sadness by shrinking ourselves. What was sad is simply surprising when we put some distance on it. This disappearance of sadness is what feels funny and makes us laugh. If sadness is hard to bear, and we seek to avoid it, then humor is much better than hate. However, sadness is a healthy emotion, and humor for its own sake easily veers into hate.

Attach:EWWDW-16.png

Our self is what we know, and our world is what we don
't.
Pridėtos 79-84 eilutės:
'''Sixsome'''

'''How we emotionally cling to our beliefs - so they won't change - and rationally can let go of our believes. Stepping in and stepping out.'''

If we listen to our feelings, then we can grow aware of ourselves and learn that our expectations are not exactly what we want and we can adjust them accordingly. I think that we grow aware of this by stepping into ourselves and stepping out of ourselves. In doing so, we discover our selves to consist of complicated expectations which we have constructed over our lives. They include what we think we know of justice, loyalty and duty. It is vital that we take our principles to heart, internalize them, in which case we sense our own will but also a greater will, beyond our circumstances, I say God's will, with which we align, for we obey not knowing why, we believe not knowing how, we care not knowing what. Upon thus stepping into ourselves, we may sense ourselves surrounded by positive moral tones of love, beauty and intimacy, which are like moods in that they engulf us, and indeed, like canvases for moods because they may last for hours or days, long enough for us to step out of our old expectations. We define ourselves on those canvases in terms of new expectations thanks to the virtues of hope, which looks forward, courage, which holds firm, and honesty, which looks back.
Ištrintos 89-96 eilutės:

Attach:EWWDW-16.png

'''Sixsome'''

'''How we emotionally cling to our beliefs - so they won't change - and rationally can let go of our believes. Stepping in and stepping out.'''

If we listen to our feelings, then we can grow aware of ourselves and learn that our expectations are not exactly what we want and we can adjust them accordingly. I think that we grow aware of this by stepping into ourselves and stepping out of ourselves. In doing so, we discover our selves to consist of complicated expectations which we have constructed over our lives. They include what we think we know of justice, loyalty and duty. It is vital that we take our principles to heart, internalize them, in which case we sense our own will but also a greater will, beyond our circumstances, I say God's will, with which we align, for we obey not knowing why, we believe not knowing how, we care not knowing what. Upon thus stepping into ourselves, we may sense ourselves surrounded by positive moral tones of love, beauty and intimacy, which are like moods in that they engulf us, and indeed, like canvases for moods because they may last for hours or days, long enough for us to step out of our old expectations. We define ourselves on those canvases in terms of new expectations thanks to the virtues of hope, which looks forward, courage, which holds firm, and honesty, which looks back.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 08:59 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Ištrintos 64-72 eilutės:
Both empathy and sympathy have us honor another person's expectations. However, empathy has us feel the same emotions because we place ourselves in the same shoes - we draw the same relevant distinctions between the self and the world.

Attach:EWWDW-14.png

'''Getting things done - foster oneness'''

Our emotional responses invite us to get things done with others: when happy - delegate, excited - initiate, surprised - articulate, sad - renew, frightened - confront, disgusted - make ourselves heard, in suspense - exercise sheer will, and at peace - respond. However, our feelings are generally much more complicated and so are our expectations as to who we truly are.
Pridėtos 67-70 eilutės:
Both empathy and sympathy have us honor another person's expectations. However, empathy has us feel the same emotions because we place ourselves in the same shoes - we draw the same relevant distinctions between the self and the world. Indeed, empathy has us expand our own sense of self so that we identify more broadly. Instead of feeling surprised that somebody died, we feel sad with their children that they did. As our self grows, our life feels ever more personal and serious.

In contrast, humor is a strategy that has us escape sadness by shrinking ourselves.
Pridėtos 78-83 eilutės:

Attach:EWWDW-14.png

'''Getting things done - foster oneness'''

Our emotional responses invite us to get things done with others: when happy - delegate, excited - initiate, surprised - articulate, sad - renew, frightened - confront, disgusted - make ourselves heard, in suspense - exercise sheer will, and at peace - respond. However, our feelings are generally much more complicated and so are our expectations as to who we truly are.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 08:53 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 65-66 eilutės:
Both empathy and sympathy have us honor another person's expectations. However, empathy has us feel the same emotions because we place ourselves in the same shoes - we draw the same relevant distinctions between the self and the world.
Pakeista 92 eilutė iš:
Both empathy and sympathy have us share the same expectations. However, empathy has us feel the same emotions because we place ourselves in the same shoes - we draw the same relevant distinctions between the self and the world.
į:
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 08:51 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Ištrintos 64-71 eilutės:
Sympathy likewise relates our exclusive selves and

encourages empathy by which we all experience the same emotional response because we imagine the same expectations and compatible notions of self. This fosters an internal unity based on a shared sense of self.


, as a person-in-general responding to all, and also sympathy, as persons-in-particular, responding to each other.
Pridėtos 89-90 eilutės:

Both empathy and sympathy have us share the same expectations. However, empathy has us feel the same emotions because we place ourselves in the same shoes - we draw the same relevant distinctions between the self and the world.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 08:43 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 61-65 eilutės iš
An inclusive self encourages empathy by which we all experience the same emotional response because we imagine the same expectations and compatible notions of self. This fosters an internal unity based on a shared sense of self. Feelings of self-assuredness, guilt and humility are healthy in that they ignore outside views and assert our own internal rationale for what it means for us to meet or fail to meet our expectations for ourselves or not to be able to make such expectations at all.

In contrast, an exclusive self accepts or imposes pride, shame or resignation from an external point of view
.
į:
An inclusive self naturally honors each individual as the best interpreter of their own expectations. Feelings of self-assuredness, guilt and humility are healthy in that they ignore outside views and assert our own internal rationale for what it means for us to meet or fail to meet our expectations for ourselves or not to be able to make such expectations at all.

In contrast, pride, shame and resignation are accepted or imposed from an external point of view. Inducing and embracing these feelings is empty and sinful in that they do not foster self-knowledge and self-governance but instead subject one to the whims of society. Yet people often accept such externally defined feelings, perhaps because they are less intense in their accountability than internally defined feelings.

Sympathy likewise relates our exclusive selves and

encourages empathy by which we all experience the same emotional response because we imagine the same expectations and compatible notions of self. This fosters an internal unity based on a shared sense of self
.
Ištrintos 71-77 eilutės:
'''Emotions of the self - which depend on what we mean by our "self" - and is that an internal point of view, or external point of view'''

''expectations about our selves: shame, guilt, pride, reassured''

''shame: if we are not what we should be (from an external point of view); guilt: if we are not what we should be (from an internal point of view); pride: if we are what we should be (from an external point of view); reassurance: if we are what we should be (from an internal point of view)''

''expectations should be internal (guilt, reassurance) and not external (shame, pride)''
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 08:25 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 59-66 eilutės iš
An inclusive self encourages empathy, as a person-in-general responding to all, and also sympathy, as persons-in-particular, responding to each other.
į:
The moral distinction between an inclusive self and an exclusive self is evident in emotional responses arising from expectations about expectations.

An inclusive self encourages empathy by which we all experience the same emotional response because we imagine the same expectations and compatible notions of self. This fosters an internal unity based on a shared sense of self. Feelings of self-assuredness, guilt and humility are healthy in that they ignore outside views and assert our own internal rationale for what it means for us to meet or fail to meet our expectations for ourselves or not to be able to make such expectations at all.

In contrast, an exclusive self accepts or imposes pride, shame or resignation from an external point of view.


, as a person-in-general responding to all, and also sympathy, as persons-in-particular, responding to each other.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 08:09 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 55-56 eilutės iš
What do we truly want? We can study our feelings to infer what our expectations must be. I studied Jesus's emotional responses in the Gospel of Mark to deduce Jesus's expectation that we all are one. I imagine that we all wish to live one with God and all. We are sad to be one with nobody, surprised to be one with somebody, excited to be one with anybody and happy to be one with everybody. An inclusive self encourages empathy, as a person-in-general responding to all, and also sympathy, as persons-in-particular, responding to each other.
į:
What do we truly want? We can study our feelings to infer what our expectations must be. I studied Jesus's emotional responses in the Gospel of Mark to deduce Jesus's expectation that we all are one. I imagine that we all wish to live one with God and all. We are sad to be one with nobody, surprised to be one with somebody, excited to be one with anybody and happy to be one with everybody.
Pridėtos 58-59 eilutės:

An inclusive self encourages empathy, as a person-in-general responding to all, and also sympathy, as persons-in-particular, responding to each other.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 08:08 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 51-52 eilutės iš
I find it helpful to contrast us, in conditions, with God, beyond conditions. This unconditional God wishes for conditional good. God wishes for nothing - is self-sufficient - but we have bodies with needs; God wishes for something - is certain - but we have minds with doubts; God wishes for anything - is calm - but we have hearts with expectations; God wishes for everything - is loving - but we have wills with values. In general, God lives by not knowing but simply wishing - and similarly, we don't know what we should be doing in life - but we are creatures of expecting and knowing, and we do know when we go astray. Our paradoxical challenge in life is to focus on that knowledge - our own personal deepest value in life - which directs us on that path of not knowing but wishing. Our body, mind, heart and will offer, in the form of pleasure, that image of what is desirable, but it is only an image, just as we might see ourselves in a mirror, and even our own self is but an image. Likewise, pain is but an image of what is undesirable. We are free to choose who we take ourselves and to develop or even ignore our sense of pleasure and pain.
į:
I find it helpful to contrast us, in conditions, with God, beyond conditions. This unconditional God wishes for conditional good. God wishes for nothing - is self-sufficient - but we have bodies with needs; God wishes for something - is certain - but we have minds with doubts; God wishes for anything - is calm - but we have hearts with expectations; God wishes for everything - is loving - but we have wills with values. In general, God lives by not knowing but simply wishing - and similarly, we don't know what we should be doing in life - but we are creatures of expecting and knowing, and we do know when we go astray. Our paradoxical challenge in life is to focus on that knowledge - our own personal deepest value in life - which directs us on that path of not knowing but wishing. Our body, mind, heart and will offer, in the form of pleasure, that image of what is desirable, but it is only an image, just as we might see ourselves in a mirror, and even our own self is but an image. Likewise, pain is but an image of what is undesirable. We are free to dedicate ourselves to our personal pleasure. We are free to transform or even ignore our sense of pleasure and pain. We are free to identify with a God who has taken up our conditions but is truly beyond them. We are free who we choose to take ourselves to be.
Pakeistos 55-63 eilutės iš
What do we truly want? I think that we wish to live one with God and all. We are sad to be one with nobody, surprised to be one with somebody, excited to be one with anybody and happy to be one with everybody.

'''Desire for oneness - the moral desire - the inclusive self. Desire for domination - the immoral desire - the exclusive self.'''

''importance of desires - what we wish - Jesus in the Gospel of Mark - wishing that we are one
- in the face of our own self-interest, our body's image of desire in terms of personal pleasure - this conflict is the source of morality''

''moral difference between being one with the body that we inhabit - living as a person in particular - and being one with all who inhabit any body - living as a person-in-general.''

''moral difference between empathy (as person-in-general) and sympathy (as persons-in-particular) - and we may need to act on that, though''
į:
What do we truly want? We can study our feelings to infer what our expectations must be. I studied Jesus's emotional responses in the Gospel of Mark to deduce Jesus's expectation that we all are one. I imagine that we all wish to live one with God and all. We are sad to be one with nobody, surprised to be one with somebody, excited to be one with anybody and happy to be one with everybody. An inclusive self encourages empathy, as a person-in-general responding to all, and also sympathy, as persons-in-particular, responding to each other.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 07:53 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 51-60 eilutės iš
I find it helpful to contrast us, in conditions, with God, beyond conditions. This unconditional God wishes for conditional good. God wishes for nothing - is self-sufficient - but we have bodies with needs; God wishes for something - is certain - but we have minds with doubt; God wishes for anything - is calm - but we have hearts with expectations; God wishes for everything - is loving - but we have wills with values.


[Image - pleasure and pain]

''Desire seeks the good.''

''Importance of desires: the desire system: desire seeks the good: the image of what we desire
- pleasure - or not - pain: but desire being more than just its image.''

''God goes beyond himself into us - from sadness into contentment. But we are in agitation (because our expectations are not exactly shared) and need to let go and go beyond ourselves into peace beyond us. So happiness has us attach to our life in the world but peace lets us go beyond the world
.''
į:
I find it helpful to contrast us, in conditions, with God, beyond conditions. This unconditional God wishes for conditional good. God wishes for nothing - is self-sufficient - but we have bodies with needs; God wishes for something - is certain - but we have minds with doubts; God wishes for anything - is calm - but we have hearts with expectations; God wishes for everything - is loving - but we have wills with values. In general, God lives by not knowing but simply wishing - and similarly, we don't know what we should be doing in life - but we are creatures of expecting and knowing, and we do know when we go astray. Our paradoxical challenge in life is to focus on that knowledge - our own personal deepest value in life - which directs us on that path of not knowing but wishing. Our body, mind, heart and will offer, in the form of pleasure, that image of what is desirable, but it is only an image, just as we might see ourselves in a mirror, and even our own self is but an image. Likewise, pain is but an image of what is undesirable. We are free to choose who we take ourselves and to develop or even ignore our sense of pleasure and pain.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 07:43 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 49-52 eilutės iš
'''God going beyond himself into the good.'''
į:
Our emotional life allows us to consider our selves in this world. Who do we take ourselves to be? Are we all simply one and the same being who inhabits a variety of worlds? Or are we a variety of beings together in the same world? Accordingly, do I choose to live as a person-in-general doing what any good person ought to do? Or do I choose to live as a person-in-particular and focus on what is specific to me? Our emotional life frames this fundamental moral choice by allowing us to identify our self with all or with one.

I find it helpful to contrast us, in conditions, with God, beyond conditions. This unconditional God wishes for conditional good. God wishes for nothing - is self-sufficient - but we have bodies with needs; God wishes for something - is certain - but we have minds with doubt; God wishes for anything - is calm - but we have hearts with expectations; God wishes for everything - is loving - but we have wills with values.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 07:27 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 45-51 eilutės iš
Our expectations are essential as we learn in life: taking a stand, following through and reflecting. Our feelings give us feedback on our learning. Ar we being, doing and thinking correctly? When we are being as we should, then our expectations match our wishes, and so we are sensitive, but otherwise insensitive. When we are doing as we should, then we are meeting our expectations, and so we are feeling positive, but otherwise negative. And when we are thinking as we should, then we

'''Purpose of our emotional life: three dimensions'''

Why then do we have feelings
and moods? Our moral sense points to the distinction between what we want and what we expect. We don't truly know what we want, what we should want. The truth of the world is that we are here and now in these circumstances, but the truth of the heart is that we don't know why. Yet even so we can formulate expectations that represent our best answer. Our feelings then serve to guide us, do we feel alive or dead? If our expectation is from the depths of our heart, from our spirit of unknowing, then we are sensitive, and otherwise insensitive. When we do the right thing, then we feel good, otherwise bad. And when we reflect, when we are thinking correctly, then we are calm and otherwise riled.

''Sensitive - we believe what we desire; positive - our expectations are met; peaceful - we are without expectations, we don't distinguish past and future, or inside and outside - we don't think in terms of a self.''
į:
Our expectations are essential as we learn in life: taking a stand, following through and reflecting. Our feelings give us feedback on our learning. Ar we being, doing and thinking correctly? When we are being as we should, then our expectations match our wishes, and so we are sensitive, but otherwise insensitive. When we are doing as we should, then we are meeting our expectations, and so we are feeling positive, but otherwise negative. And when we are thinking as we should, then we have let go of our expectations, we are not prejudiced by our selves and our world, and we feel at peace, not riled. Thus we can embrace our expectations to inhabit our selves and be sensitive in our world, we can respond wholeheartedly, and we can then let go of our expectations to be at peace and think fresh.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 07:23 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 44-45 eilutės:

Our expectations are essential as we learn in life: taking a stand, following through and reflecting. Our feelings give us feedback on our learning. Ar we being, doing and thinking correctly? When we are being as we should, then our expectations match our wishes, and so we are sensitive, but otherwise insensitive. When we are doing as we should, then we are meeting our expectations, and so we are feeling positive, but otherwise negative. And when we are thinking as we should, then we
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 07:09 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 9 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. From this model it will become apparent that the purpose of our emotional life is to help us understand our expectations, engage them and learn from them. First, I will show how the consequences of our expectations give rise to a set of basic emotions by which we distinguish our self and our world. This yields a map of an emotional manifold which we navigate and transform to define and redefine ourselves. Next, I will explore how our morality arises from our fundamental wish to consider us all as one self living in different worlds, rather than as different selves living in one world. In particular, we experience healthy emotions, including sadness, when we expect what we wish, but unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. From this model it will become apparent that the purpose of our emotional life is to help us understand our expectations, engage them and learn from them. First, I will show how the consequences of our expectations give rise to a set of basic emotions by which we distinguish our self and our world. This yields a map of an emotional manifold which we navigate and transform to define and redefine ourselves. Next, I will explore how our morality arises from our expectations about our expectations, and especially, our fundamental wish to consider us all as one self living in different worlds, rather than as different selves living in one world. In particular, we experience healthy emotions, including sadness, when we expect what we wish, but unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show that by studying poems we can learn how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 07:04 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 37-42 eilutės iš
'''Unhealthy vs. Healthy emotions: Clash of expectations and desires.'''

Next, I explain how a moral dimension arises
when we make expectations about our expectations, for example, when we judge that our expectations will likely not be met and thus we become anxious that we will be sad. Negative moral tones arise when we expect that which we do not wish. Reflecting on this discord, our suspense becomes anxiety. If our suspicions are confirmed, then we feel hate (rather than sadness) and anger (rather than surprise). If our suspicions are refuted, then we feel relief (rather than excitement) and depression (rather than happiness). We thus find that depression occurs precisely when we could have been happy (because what we wanted to expect actually happened) but instead we feel incapacitated (because we wrongly expected what we did not want).

''Expand with more specific examples
.''
į:
Next, I explain how a moral dimension arises when we make expectations about our expectations, for example, when we judge that our expectations will likely not be met and thus we become anxious that we will be sad. Negative moral tones arise when we expect that which we do not wish. Reflecting on this discord, our suspense becomes anxiety. If our suspicions are confirmed, then we feel hate (rather than sadness) and anger (rather than surprise). If our suspicions are refuted, then we feel relief (rather than excitement) and depression (rather than happiness). For example, if I expected to find my bicycle where I left it, then I will be surprised if I don't; but if I expected it to be stolen, then I will be angry if it is, but relieved if it is not. If I expect my sweetheart is true, then I will be distraught if she is not; but if I expect her to be unfaithful, then I will feel hate if she is unfaithful, and if rather she is not unfaithful, then I will feel depressed because I have meanwhile invested myself in a mistress who I do not care for. Similarly, if I turn my back on my dream of becoming a movie director, and I commit myself to working in a factory in Ireland, then I will feel depressed, entrenched and incapacitated if I do have the chance of going to film school. We thus find that depression occurs precisely when we could have been happy (because what we wanted to expect actually happened) but instead we feel incapacitated (because we wrongly expected what we did not want).
Pakeistos 41-43 eilutės iš
'''Positive moral tones'''

We feel positive moral tones as the impossibility of negative moral tones. For example, if
we only expect what we truly wish for, then we feel love as the impossibility of hate. If we perceive that everything is outside of us, then disgust is impossible, and so we feel beauty. If we perceive that everything is within us, then fright is impossible, and so we feel intimacy. Thus we feel love, beauty and intimacy not as our own emotional responses, but rather as emanating from our environment - loving, beautiful, intimate.
į:
We feel positive moral tones as the impossibility of negative moral tones. For example, if we only expect what we truly wish for, then we feel love as the impossibility of hate. If we perceive that everything is outside of us, then disgust is impossible, and so we feel beauty. If we perceive that everything is within us, then fright is impossible, and so we feel intimacy. Thus we feel love, beauty and intimacy not as our own emotional responses, but rather as afterglows, emanating from our environment - loving, beautiful, intimate.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 06:52 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 33-44 eilutės iš
The nature of the map
* ''Problem with typical 2x2 models - no way
to make distinctions - to refer to emotions''
* ''Can
have emotional maps - just like body maps - but they don't have to be implemented in a unified way in individuals''

* ''Similarly, in language, phonetic systems are implemented physiologically
but there isn't any particular phonetic system or physiological implementation that is canonical.''

They don't see an emotional life, an emotional language, an emotional manifold

* ''There can be paradigmatic physical manifestations that relate to particular emotions and needs - but that is not essential. The manifold uses that as reference points, not as necessary
.''

Mind and brain
''This shows that there is a fundamental distinction between mind and brain.''
į:
We are able to compare our many feelings as if they belonged to the same system. This suggests that our brains have a neurological map of our emotional system just as our brains have maps of our body. But the reality of this manifold is not in any particular map but in the fact that a feeling is located in the same place on that map whether we simply imagine it or whether tears fall from our eyes as we experience it. Similarly, a word is the same whether we hear it in our minds or we speak it with our vocal chords.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 06:44 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 31-32 eilutės iš
The typical 2x2 models which psychologists do appeal to are based on continuous variations, as if they were spectrums of sounds or colors. Such continuous models are completely inappropriate for supporting an emotional language. A language must be based on structural distinctions such as musical scales or phonological contrasts.
į:
The typical 2x2 models which psychologists do appeal to are based on continuous variations, as if they were spectrums of sounds or colors. Such continuous models are completely inappropriate for supporting an emotional language because there lack features for drawing distinctions. A language must be based on structural distinctions as we have with musical scales or phonetic contrasts. Psychologists have thus not recognized that feelings derive from our expectations, whether we can make them or not, whether they are met or not. Psychologists are not aware that the central theme of our emotional language is drawing a distinction between our self and our world.
Pakeista 40 eilutė iš:
* ''This shows that we have experience an emotional manifold - compare with linguist and whispering or shouting.''
į:
Pridėtos 132-133 eilutės:

Psychologists do not believe that we experience a language of thousands of moods which ... They only know of good moods and bad moods...
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 06:37 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 30-31 eilutės:

The typical 2x2 models which psychologists do appeal to are based on continuous variations, as if they were spectrums of sounds or colors. Such continuous models are completely inappropriate for supporting an emotional language. A language must be based on structural distinctions such as musical scales or phonological contrasts.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 06:32 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 27 eilutė iš:
Neurologists such as Panksepp are able to point to particular emotional systems, which he termed FEAR, RAGE, LUST, CARE, GRIEF/PANIC, PLAY and SEEKING. It makes sense that these disparate systems developed to serve specific evolutionary purposes. However, neurologists and psychologists have not recognized that our mind has a single emotional manifold which integrates distinct emotional systems, just as it has a sensory manifold which integrates vision, sound and touch. They don't consider the system as a whole, and so they aren't aware of externally nonobservable feelings such as peace and suspense, but are instead prone to making dubious claims about particular feelings. Thus Panksepp imagines that rats in the SEEKING mode are experiencing euphoria because they choose that state to the point of death by exhaustion, and yet it seems much more likely that the rats are feeling suspense, which even at low levels can keep humans playing video games interminably. And Panksepp claims that happiness is the evolutionary goal of life. But if we realize that happiness is just a symptom, then it becomes meaningful instead to seek peace so that we gain wisdom from being sensitive to the feedback of a variety of feelings.
į:
Neurologists such as Panksepp point to particular emotional systems, which he termed FEAR, RAGE, LUST, CARE, GRIEF/PANIC, PLAY and SEEKING. It makes sense that these disparate systems developed to serve specific evolutionary purposes. However, neurologists and psychologists have not recognized that our mind experiences a single emotional manifold which integrates distinct emotional systems, just as it has a sensory manifold which integrates vision, sound and touch. They don't consider the system as a whole, and so they aren't aware of externally nonobservable feelings such as peace and suspense, but are instead prone to making dubious claims about particular feelings. Thus Panksepp imagines that rats in the SEEKING mode are experiencing euphoria because they choose that state to the point of death by exhaustion, and yet it seems much more likely that the rats are feeling suspense, which even at low levels can keep humans playing video games interminably. And Panksepp claims that happiness is the evolutionary goal of life. But if we realize that happiness is just a symptom, then it becomes meaningful instead to seek peace so that we gain wisdom from being sensitive to the feedback of a variety of feelings.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 06:30 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 25-41 eilutės iš
We can thus evoke distinct, basic, pure, vivid emotional responses by manipulating abstract expectations. Whereas psychologists focus on physiology and conclude that there are no basic emotions, indeed, no reproducible emotions, because they lack any consistent expression. It is as if they were linguists for whom shouting and whispering were different activities and who never understood that they may convey the same name. It is as if they thought that the principles of mathematics are somewhere to be found in the particulars of a computer's hardware and software implementation of addition and subtraction. They do not appreciate the mind as an abstract system of activity which maintains a coherence that need not have any particular neurological analogue.

Neurologists such
as Panksepp are able to point to particular emotional systems, which he termed FEAR, RAGE, LUST, CARE, GRIEF/PANIC, PLAY and SEEKING. It makes sense that these systems arose to serve specific evolutionary purposes.

''Problem with psychologist and neurologist accounts''

Phenomenological problems
* ''They can't agree on basic emotions and now argue that they don't exist.''
* ''These accounts don't predict for nonobservable emotions - no model for PEACE''
* ''Problem Panksepp - interpreting SEEKING as euphoria rather than suspense. Supposing that happiness is the evolutionary goal of life
.''
* ''Suspense is
the key emotion - seeking - panksepp system - importance of peace for sensitivity and learning from our emotions about our expectations''

They don't see an emotional life, an emotional language, an emotional manifold
* ''This shows
that we have experience an emotional manifold - compare with linguist and whispering or shouting.''
* ''There can be paradigmatic physical manifestations that relate to particular emotions and needs - but that is not essential. The manifold uses that as reference points, not as necessary
.''
* ''Similarly, in language, phonetic systems are implemented physiologically but there isn't any particular phonetic system or physiological implementation
that is canonical.''
į:
We can thus evoke distinct, basic, pure, vivid emotional responses by manipulating abstract expectations. It is remarkable that psychologists have not appreciated the significance of our imagination's ability to evoke feelings. They focus on physiology and conclude that there are no basic emotions, indeed, no reproducible emotions, because they lack any consistent expression. It is as if they were linguists for whom shouting and whispering were different activities and who never understood that they may convey the same name. It is as if they thought that the principles of mathematics are somewhere to be found in the particulars of a computer's hardware and software implementation of addition and subtraction. They do not appreciate the mind as an abstract system of activity which maintains a coherence that need not have any particular neurological analogue.

Neurologists such as Panksepp are able to point to particular emotional
systems, which he termed FEAR, RAGE, LUST, CARE, GRIEF/PANIC, PLAY and SEEKING. It makes sense that these disparate systems developed to serve specific evolutionary purposes. However, neurologists and psychologists have not recognized that our mind has a single emotional manifold which integrates distinct emotional systems, just as it has a sensory manifold which integrates vision, sound and touch. They don't consider the system as a whole, and so they aren't aware of externally nonobservable feelings such as peace and suspense, but are instead prone to making dubious claims about particular feelings. Thus Panksepp imagines that rats in the SEEKING mode are experiencing euphoria because they choose that state to the point of death by exhaustion, and yet it seems much more likely that the rats are feeling suspense, which even at low levels can keep humans playing video games interminably. And Panksepp claims that happiness is the evolutionary goal of life. But if we realize that happiness is just a symptom, then it becomes meaningful instead to seek peace so that we gain wisdom from being sensitive to the feedback of a variety of feelings.
Pridėtos 34-39 eilutės:

* ''Similarly, in language, phonetic systems are implemented physiologically but there isn't any particular phonetic system or physiological implementation that is canonical.''

They don't see an emotional life, an emotional language, an emotional manifold
* ''This shows that we have experience an emotional manifold - compare with linguist and whispering or shouting.''
* ''There can be paradigmatic physical manifestations that relate to particular emotions and needs - but that is not essential. The manifold uses that as reference points, not as necessary.''
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 05:52 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 25-27 eilutės iš
We can thus evoke distinct, basic, pure, vivid emotional responses by manipulating abstract expectations. Whereas psychologists focus on physiology and conclude that there are no basic emotions, indeed, no reproducible emotions, because they lack consistent manifestation. It is as if they were linguists for whom shouting and whispering were different activities and who never understood that they may convey the same name. It is as if they thought that the principles of mathematics are somewhere to be found in the particulars of a computer's hardware and software.
į:
We can thus evoke distinct, basic, pure, vivid emotional responses by manipulating abstract expectations. Whereas psychologists focus on physiology and conclude that there are no basic emotions, indeed, no reproducible emotions, because they lack any consistent expression. It is as if they were linguists for whom shouting and whispering were different activities and who never understood that they may convey the same name. It is as if they thought that the principles of mathematics are somewhere to be found in the particulars of a computer's hardware and software implementation of addition and subtraction. They do not appreciate the mind as an abstract system of activity which maintains a coherence that need not have any particular neurological analogue.

Neurologists such as Panksepp are able to point to particular emotional systems, which he termed FEAR, RAGE, LUST, CARE, GRIEF/PANIC, PLAY and SEEKING. It makes sense that these systems arose to serve specific evolutionary purposes.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 05:33 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 24-25 eilutės:

We can thus evoke distinct, basic, pure, vivid emotional responses by manipulating abstract expectations. Whereas psychologists focus on physiology and conclude that there are no basic emotions, indeed, no reproducible emotions, because they lack consistent manifestation. It is as if they were linguists for whom shouting and whispering were different activities and who never understood that they may convey the same name. It is as if they thought that the principles of mathematics are somewhere to be found in the particulars of a computer's hardware and software.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 05:08 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Ištrintos 19-20 eilutės:

'''Additional nonobservable emotional responses'''
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 05:07 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Ištrintos 11-12 eilutės:

'''Basic emotions'''
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 05:06 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 15 eilutė iš:
A first step is to model our most basic emotional responses. I started with six responses which are essentially those which psychologist Paul Ekman found can be observed in the faces of young infants, namely: happiness, sadness, excitement, surprise, fear and disgust. What is the simplest way that I might evoke these responses within myself? I once read that we are struck by existential sadness when our deeply held assumptions turn out to be wrong. So I imagined myself as a child playing with alphabet blocks. I would pick up a block, guess what letter was on the other side, and see if I was right.
į:
A first step is to model our most basic emotional responses. I started with six responses which are essentially those which psychologist Paul Ekman found can be observed in the faces of young infants, namely: happiness, sadness, excitement, surprise, fright and disgust. What is the simplest way that I might evoke these responses within myself? I once read that we are struck by existential sadness when our deeply held assumptions turn out to be wrong. So I imagined myself as a child playing with alphabet blocks. I would pick up a block, guess what letter was on the other side, and see if I was right.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 05:02 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Ištrintos 7-8 eilutės:

'''Summary'''
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 05:01 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 11 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. From this model it will become apparent that the purpose of our emotional life is to help us understand our expectations, engage them and learn from them. First, I will show how the consequences of our expectations give rise to a set of basic emotions by which we distinguish our self and our world. This yields a map of an emotional manifold which we navigate and transform to define and redefine ourselves. Next, I will explore how our morality arises from our fundamental wish to consider us all as one individual living in different situations. In particular, we experience healthy emotions, including sadness, when we expect what we wish, but unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. From this model it will become apparent that the purpose of our emotional life is to help us understand our expectations, engage them and learn from them. First, I will show how the consequences of our expectations give rise to a set of basic emotions by which we distinguish our self and our world. This yields a map of an emotional manifold which we navigate and transform to define and redefine ourselves. Next, I will explore how our morality arises from our fundamental wish to consider us all as one self living in different worlds, rather than as different selves living in one world. In particular, we experience healthy emotions, including sadness, when we expect what we wish, but unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 04:57 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 11 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. From this model it will become apparent that the purpose of our emotional life is to help us understand our expectations, engage them and learn from them. First, I will show how the consequences of our expectations give rise to a set of basic emotions. This yields a map of an emotional manifold which we navigate and transform. Next, I will explore how aspects of morality arise as we further define our expectations. In general, our morality arises from our expecting that we are all one individual living in different situations. But in particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. From this model it will become apparent that the purpose of our emotional life is to help us understand our expectations, engage them and learn from them. First, I will show how the consequences of our expectations give rise to a set of basic emotions by which we distinguish our self and our world. This yields a map of an emotional manifold which we navigate and transform to define and redefine ourselves. Next, I will explore how our morality arises from our fundamental wish to consider us all as one individual living in different situations. In particular, we experience healthy emotions, including sadness, when we expect what we wish, but unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 04:48 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 11 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. From this model it will become apparent that the purpose of our emotional life is to help us understand our expectations, engage them and learn from them. First, I will show how the consequences of our expectations give rise to a set of basic emotions. This yields a map of an emotional manifold which we navigate and transform. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. From this model it will become apparent that the purpose of our emotional life is to help us understand our expectations, engage them and learn from them. First, I will show how the consequences of our expectations give rise to a set of basic emotions. This yields a map of an emotional manifold which we navigate and transform. Next, I will explore how aspects of morality arise as we further define our expectations. In general, our morality arises from our expecting that we are all one individual living in different situations. But in particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 00:35 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 153 eilutė iš:
Attach:EWWDW-18.png
į:
Attach:EWWDW-19.png
2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 00:00 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 142-143 eilutės iš
http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/09-Li-Bai.png
į:
Attach:EWWDW-17.png
Pridėtos 152-153 eilutės:

Attach:EWWDW-18.png
2017 rugsėjo 08 d., 23:51 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 126 eilutė iš:
http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/08-virtues.png
į:
Attach:EWWDW-16.png
2017 rugsėjo 08 d., 22:43 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 115-116 eilutės:

Attach:EWWDW-15.png
2017 rugsėjo 08 d., 22:25 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 108-109 eilutės:

Attach:EWWDW-14.png
2017 rugsėjo 08 d., 22:06 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 21 eilutė iš:
Suppose I don't know the block very well. If I guess wrong, then I am surprised, but if I guess right, then I am excited. However, if I know the block with absolute certainty, if I can't imagine I could be wrong, if my self and my world depend on that, and yet indeed I am wrong, then I feel devastated, but if I am right, I feel content and assured. And so by such introspection it is clear that our cognition grounds our emotion. A crucial distinction is between that knowledge which we personally identify with, by which we define ourselves, and that knowledge which is more distant, exploratory, theoretical. When I experience the unexpected, then if it comes from beyond, I am frightened, and if it comes from within, I feel disgusted.
į:
Suppose I don't know the block very well. If I guess wrong, then I am surprised, but if I guess right, then I am excited. However, if I know the block with absolute certainty, if I can't imagine I could be wrong, if my self and my world depend on that, and yet indeed I am wrong, then I feel devastated, but if I am right, I feel content and assured. And so by such introspection it is clear that our cognition grounds our emotion. A crucial distinction is between that knowledge which we personally identify with, by which we define ourselves, and that knowledge which is more distant, exploratory, theoretical. Furthermore, when I experience what I can't in any way expect because it is too sudden, too strange or too undesireable, then if it comes from beyond, I am frightened, and if it comes from within, I feel disgusted.
2017 rugsėjo 08 d., 15:48 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
2017 rugsėjo 08 d., 13:24 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 99 eilutė iš:
[Image - emotions of the self]
į:
Attach:EWWDW-12.png
2017 rugsėjo 08 d., 11:35 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Ištrintos 76-77 eilutės:
Attach:EWWDW-11.png
Ištrintos 78-79 eilutės:
What do we truly want? I think that we wish to live one with God and all. We are sad to be one with nobody, surprised to be one with somebody, excited to be one with anybody and happy to be one with everybody.
Pakeistos 87-89 eilutės iš
[Image - moral choice of inclusion or exclusion]
į:
Attach:EWWDW-11.png

What do we truly want? I think that we wish to live one with God and all. We are sad to be one with nobody, surprised to be one with somebody, excited to be one with anybody and happy to be one with everybody.
2017 rugsėjo 08 d., 11:23 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 77 eilutė iš:
http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/07-being-one-with.png
į:
Attach:EWWDW-11.png
2017 rugsėjo 08 d., 10:13 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 74-75 eilutės:

Attach:EWWDW-10.png
2017 rugsėjo 08 d., 08:58 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 73-74 eilutės:
''Sensitive - we believe what we desire; positive - our expectations are met; peaceful - we are without expectations, we don't distinguish past and future, or inside and outside - we don't think in terms of a self.''
Pakeistos 79-88 eilutės iš
What do we truly want? I think that we wish to live one with God and all. We are sad to be one with nobody, surprised to be one with somebody, excited to be one with anybody and happy to be one with everybody. Our emotional responses invite us to get things done with others: when happy - delegate, excited - initiate, surprised - articulate, sad - renew, frightened - confront, disgusted - make ourselves heard, in suspense - exercise sheer will, and at peace - respond. However, our feelings are generally much more complicated and so are our expectations as to who we truly are.

'''Desire for oneness - the moral desire - the inclusive self. Desire for domination - the immoral desire - the exclusive self.'''

''importance of desires - what we wish - Jesus in the Gospel of Mark - wishing that we are one - in the face of our own self-interest, our body's image of desire in terms of personal pleasure - this conflict is the source of morality''

''moral difference between being one with the body that we inhabit - living as a person in particular - and being one with all who inhabit any body - living as a person-in-general.''

''moral difference between empathy (as person-in-general) and sympathy (as persons-in-particular) - and we may need to act on that, though''
į:
What do we truly want? I think that we wish to live one with God and all. We are sad to be one with nobody, surprised to be one with somebody, excited to be one with anybody and happy to be one with everybody.
Pridėtos 89-98 eilutės:
[Image - moral choice of inclusion or exclusion]

'''Desire for oneness - the moral desire - the inclusive self. Desire for domination - the immoral desire - the exclusive self.'''

''importance of desires - what we wish - Jesus in the Gospel of Mark - wishing that we are one - in the face of our own self-interest, our body's image of desire in terms of personal pleasure - this conflict is the source of morality''

''moral difference between being one with the body that we inhabit - living as a person in particular - and being one with all who inhabit any body - living as a person-in-general.''

''moral difference between empathy (as person-in-general) and sympathy (as persons-in-particular) - and we may need to act on that, though''
Pridėtos 108-111 eilutės:

'''Getting things done - foster oneness'''

Our emotional responses invite us to get things done with others: when happy - delegate, excited - initiate, surprised - articulate, sad - renew, frightened - confront, disgusted - make ourselves heard, in suspense - exercise sheer will, and at peace - respond. However, our feelings are generally much more complicated and so are our expectations as to who we truly are.
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 23:24 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 66-67 eilutės:

Attach:EWWDW-09.jpg
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 23:14 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 61-63 eilutės iš
http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/05-positivemoraltone.png

http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/06-HeartWorld.png
į:
Attach:EWWDW-08.jpg
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 22:45 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 63-64 eilutės:
http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/06-HeartWorld.png
Pridėtos 69-78 eilutės:
'''Purpose of our emotional life: three dimensions'''

Why then do we have feelings and moods? Our moral sense points to the distinction between what we want and what we expect. We don't truly know what we want, what we should want. The truth of the world is that we are here and now in these circumstances, but the truth of the heart is that we don't know why. Yet even so we can formulate expectations that represent our best answer. Our feelings then serve to guide us, do we feel alive or dead? If our expectation is from the depths of our heart, from our spirit of unknowing, then we are sensitive, and otherwise insensitive. When we do the right thing, then we feel good, otherwise bad. And when we reflect, when we are thinking correctly, then we are calm and otherwise riled.

http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/07-being-one-with.png

'''God going beyond himself into the good.'''

What do we truly want? I think that we wish to live one with God and all. We are sad to be one with nobody, surprised to be one with somebody, excited to be one with anybody and happy to be one with everybody. Our emotional responses invite us to get things done with others: when happy - delegate, excited - initiate, surprised - articulate, sad - renew, frightened - confront, disgusted - make ourselves heard, in suspense - exercise sheer will, and at peace - respond. However, our feelings are generally much more complicated and so are our expectations as to who we truly are.
Ištrintos 86-91 eilutės:
http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/07-being-one-with.png

'''God going beyond himself into the good.'''

What do we truly want? I think that we wish to live one with God and all. We are sad to be one with nobody, surprised to be one with somebody, excited to be one with anybody and happy to be one with everybody. Our emotional responses invite us to get things done with others: when happy - delegate, excited - initiate, surprised - articulate, sad - renew, frightened - confront, disgusted - make ourselves heard, in suspense - exercise sheer will, and at peace - respond. However, our feelings are generally much more complicated and so are our expectations as to who we truly are.
Ištrintos 112-117 eilutės:

http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/06-HeartWorld.png

'''Purpose of our emotional life: three dimensions'''

Why then do we have feelings and moods? Our moral sense points to the distinction between what we want and what we expect. We don't truly know what we want, what we should want. The truth of the world is that we are here and now in these circumstances, but the truth of the heart is that we don't know why. Yet even so we can formulate expectations that represent our best answer. Our feelings then serve to guide us, do we feel alive or dead? If our expectation is from the depths of our heart, from our spirit of unknowing, then we are sensitive, and otherwise insensitive. When we do the right thing, then we feel good, otherwise bad. And when we reflect, when we are thinking correctly, then we are calm and otherwise riled.
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 22:42 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Ištrintos 66-67 eilutės:
''expectations about our selves: shame, guilt, pride, reassured''
Pridėtos 81-82 eilutės:
[Image - pleasure and pain]
Pridėtos 89-90 eilutės:
[Image - emotions of the self]
Pridėtos 92-93 eilutės:

''expectations about our selves: shame, guilt, pride, reassured''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 22:40 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Ištrintos 60-61 eilutės:
''Importance of desires: the desire system: desire seeks the good: the image of what we desire - pleasure - or not - pain: but desire being more than just its image.''
Pridėtos 84-85 eilutės:

''Importance of desires: the desire system: desire seeks the good: the image of what we desire - pleasure - or not - pain: but desire being more than just its image.''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 22:26 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 53 eilutė iš:
http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/04-negativemoraltone.jpg
į:
Attach:EWWDW-07.jpg
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 22:23 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 43-44 eilutės:

Attach:EWWDW-06.jpg
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 22:18 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 23 eilutė iš:
Attach:EWWDW-04.jpg
į:
Attach:EWWDW-04.png
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 22:17 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 23 eilutė iš:
Attach:EWWDW-04.png
į:
Attach:EWWDW-04.jpg
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 22:17 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 23-24 eilutės iš
Attach:EWWDW-03.png
į:
Attach:EWWDW-04.png
Pakeista 29 eilutė iš:
Attach:EWWDW-04.jpg
į:
Attach:EWWDW-05.jpg
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 22:15 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 23-24 eilutės iš
Attach:EWWDW-F.png
į:
Attach:EWWDW-03.png
Pridėtos 28-29 eilutės:

Attach:EWWDW-04.jpg
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 21:34 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 31-46 eilutės iš
''These accounts don't predict for nonobservable emotions - no model for PEACE''

''Problem Panksepp - interpreting SEEKING as euphoria rather than suspense. Supposing that happiness is the evolutionary goal of life.''

''This shows
that we have experience an emotional manifold - compare with linguist and whispering or shouting.''

''Can have emotional maps
- just like body maps - but they don't have to be implemented in a unified way in individuals''

''Problem with typical 2x2 models - no way to make distinctions - to refer to emotions''

''There can be paradigmatic physical manifestations that relate to particular emotions and needs - but
that is not essential.''

''Suspense is the key emotion
- seeking - panksepp system - importance of peace for sensitivity and learning from our emotions about our expectations''

''Similarly, in language, phonetic systems are implemented physiologically but there isn't any particular phonetic system or physiological implementation that is canonical.''
į:
Phenomenological problems
*
''They can't agree on basic emotions and now argue that they don't exist.''
* ''These accounts don't predict for nonobservable emotions - no model for PEACE''
* ''Problem Panksepp - interpreting SEEKING as euphoria rather than suspense
. Supposing that happiness is the evolutionary goal of life.''
* ''Suspense is the key emotion - seeking - panksepp system
- importance of peace for sensitivity and learning from our emotions about our expectations''

They don't see an emotional life, an emotional language, an emotional manifold
* ''This shows that we have experience an emotional manifold - compare with linguist and whispering or shouting.''
* ''There can be paradigmatic physical manifestations
that relate to particular emotions and needs - but that is not essential. The manifold uses that as reference points, not as necessary.''
* ''Similarly, in language, phonetic systems are implemented physiologically but there isn't any particular phonetic system or physiological implementation that is canonical.''

The nature of the map
* ''Problem with typical 2x2 models - no way to make distinctions - to refer to emotions''
* ''Can have emotional maps - just like body maps - but they don't have to be implemented in a unified way in individuals''

Mind and brain
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 20:56 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 23 eilutė iš:
http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/03-emotionalresponses.jpg
į:
Attach:EWWDW-F.png
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 20:42 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 19 eilutė iš:
http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/02-six-responses.jpg
į:
Attach:EWWDW-03.png
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 20:07 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 13 eilutė iš:
http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/01-babyemotions.jpg
į:
Attach:EWWDW-02.jpg
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 16:19 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 57-58 eilutės iš
''Importance of desires: the desire system: the image of what we desire - pleasure - or not - pain: but desire being more than just its image.''
į:
''Importance of desires: the desire system: desire seeks the good: the image of what we desire - pleasure - or not - pain: but desire being more than just its image.''
Pridėtos 80-81 eilutės:

''Desire seeks the good.''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 16:16 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 89-91 eilutės:

'''Change in the boundary of the self'''
Pridėtos 100-101 eilutės:
'''Purpose of our emotional life: three dimensions'''
Pakeistos 106-107 eilutės iš
'''Purpose of our emotional life'''
į:
'''Sixsome'''

'''How we emotionally cling to our beliefs - so they won't change - and rationally can let go of our believes. Stepping in and stepping out.
'''
Pakeistos 149-151 eilutės iš
''Compare with Gregory Currie's talk about how literature evokes our emotional responses''

'''How we emotionally cling to our beliefs - so they won't change - and rationally can let go of our believes. Stepping in and stepping out.'
''
į:
''Compare with Gregory Currie's talk about how literature evokes our emotional responses''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 16:12 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 82-83 eilutės:

'''Emotions of the self - which depend on what we mean by our "self" - and is that an internal point of view, or external point of view'''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 16:07 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 140-142 eilutės iš
''Compare with Gregory Currie's talk about how literature evokes our emotional responses''
į:
''Compare with Gregory Currie's talk about how literature evokes our emotional responses''

'''How we emotionally cling to our beliefs - so they won't change - and rationally can let go of our believes. Stepping in and stepping out.'
''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 16:05 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 67-68 eilutės:
'''Desire for oneness - the moral desire - the inclusive self. Desire for domination - the immoral desire - the exclusive self.'''
Pakeista 77 eilutė iš:
'''
į:
'''God going beyond himself into the good.'''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 15:56 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 51-52 eilutės:
'''Unhealthy vs. Healthy emotions: Clash of expectations and desires.'''
Pridėtos 61-62 eilutės:
'''Positive moral tones'''
Pridėtos 74-75 eilutės:

'''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 15:47 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 45 eilutė iš:
''Similary, in language, phonetic systems are implemented physiologically but there isn't any particular phonetic system or physiological implementation that is canonical.''
į:
''Similarly, in language, phonetic systems are implemented physiologically but there isn't any particular phonetic system or physiological implementation that is canonical.''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 15:45 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 9-10 eilutės:
'''Summary'''
Pridėtos 15-16 eilutės:
'''Basic emotions'''
Pridėtos 25-26 eilutės:
'''Additional nonobservable emotional responses'''
Pridėtos 30-33 eilutės:

''These accounts don't predict for nonobservable emotions - no model for PEACE''

''Problem Panksepp - interpreting SEEKING as euphoria rather than suspense. Supposing that happiness is the evolutionary goal of life.''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 15:38 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 81-82 eilutės:
'''Purpose of our emotional life'''
Pridėtos 84-87 eilutės:

''We are usually not consciously aware of our expectations but our emotions make us relevant of them at the relevant time.''

''Listening to our moods. Drugs as substitutes to moods.''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 15:14 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 63-64 eilutės iš
''God goes beyond himself into us - from sadness into contentment. But we are in agitation (because our expectations are not exactly shared) and need to let go and go beyond ourselves into peace beyond us. So happiness has us attach to our life in the world but peace lets us go beyond the world.
į:
''God goes beyond himself into us - from sadness into contentment. But we are in agitation (because our expectations are not exactly shared) and need to let go and go beyond ourselves into peace beyond us. So happiness has us attach to our life in the world but peace lets us go beyond the world.''

''shame: if we are not what we should be (from an external point of view); guilt: if we are not what we should be (from an internal point of view); pride: if we are what we should be (from an external point of view); reassurance: if we are what we should be (from an internal point of view)''

''expectations should be internal (guilt, reassurance) and not external (shame, pride)''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 15:00 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 66 eilutė iš:
''shrinking of our self - humor; expansion of our self - seriousness but also empathy. Humor is an a form of sadness avoidance which is an alternative to hatred''
į:
''shrinking of our self - humor; expansion of our self - seriousness but also empathy. Humor is an a form of sadness avoidance which is an alternative to hatred.''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 13:16 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 6-7 eilutės:

Attach:EWWDW-01.png
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 13:12 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 5 eilutė iš:
[++The Source of Anger, Hate, Relief and Depression.++]f
į:
[++The Source of Anger, Hate, Relief and Depression.++]
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 13:12 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 109-111 eilutės iš
I invite us to work together to analyze hundreds of poems and discover a geometry of moods.
į:
I invite us to work together to analyze hundreds of poems and discover a geometry of moods.

''Compare with Gregory Currie's talk about how literature evokes our emotional responses''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 13:09 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 5-6 eilutės iš
[++The Source of Anger, Hate, Relief and Depression.++]
į:
[++The Source of Anger, Hate, Relief and Depression.++]f
Pakeista 64 eilutė iš:
''shrinking of our self - humor; expansion of our self - seriousness but also empathy''
į:
''shrinking of our self - humor; expansion of our self - seriousness but also empathy. Humor is an a form of sadness avoidance which is an alternative to hatred''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 13:05 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 53-56 eilutės:
''moral difference between being one with the body that we inhabit - living as a person in particular - and being one with all who inhabit any body - living as a person-in-general.''

''moral difference between empathy (as person-in-general) and sympathy (as persons-in-particular) - and we may need to act on that, though''
Pakeista 64 eilutė iš:
''shrinking of our self - humor; expansion of our self - empathy''
į:
''shrinking of our self - humor; expansion of our self - seriousness but also empathy''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 12:00 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 63-64 eilutės:

''define rationality as not thinking in terms of one's self - one's prejudices, biases, self-interests - letting go - and as emotion as introducing the self''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 11:50 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 32-35 eilutės:

''Similary, in language, phonetic systems are implemented physiologically but there isn't any particular phonetic system or physiological implementation that is canonical.''

''This shows that there is a fundamental distinction between mind and brain.''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 11:48 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 24-25 eilutės:

''Can have emotional maps - just like body maps - but they don't have to be implemented in a unified way in individuals''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 11:47 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 21-22 eilutės:
''Problem with psychologist and neurologist accounts''
Pridėtos 24-25 eilutės:

''Problem with typical 2x2 models - no way to make distinctions - to refer to emotions''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 11:46 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 20-25 eilutės:

''This shows that we have experience an emotional manifold - compare with linguist and whispering or shouting.''

''There can be paradigmatic physical manifestations that relate to particular emotions and needs - but that is not essential.''

''Suspense is the key emotion - seeking - panksepp system - importance of peace for sensitivity and learning from our emotions about our expectations''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 11:40 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 7 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. From this model it will become apparent that the purpose of our emotional life is to help us understand our expectations, engage them and learn from them. First, I will show how the consequences of our expectations give rise to a set of basic emotions. This yields a map of an emotional manifold which we navigate and transform. I derive this map from the various ways we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. From this model it will become apparent that the purpose of our emotional life is to help us understand our expectations, engage them and learn from them. First, I will show how the consequences of our expectations give rise to a set of basic emotions. This yields a map of an emotional manifold which we navigate and transform. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 11:39 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 7 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. From this model it will become apparent that the purpose of our emotional life is to help us understand our expectations, engage them and learn from them. First, I will map out an emotional manifold of basic emotional responses which we navigate and transform. I derive this map from the various ways we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. From this model it will become apparent that the purpose of our emotional life is to help us understand our expectations, engage them and learn from them. First, I will show how the consequences of our expectations give rise to a set of basic emotions. This yields a map of an emotional manifold which we navigate and transform. I derive this map from the various ways we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 11:38 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 7 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. From this model it will become apparent that the purpose of our emotional life is to help us understand our expectations and learn from them. First, I will map out an emotional manifold of basic emotional responses which we navigate and transform. I derive this map from the various ways we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. From this model it will become apparent that the purpose of our emotional life is to help us understand our expectations, engage them and learn from them. First, I will map out an emotional manifold of basic emotional responses which we navigate and transform. I derive this map from the various ways we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 11:36 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 7 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will map out an emotional manifold of basic emotional responses which we navigate and transform. I derive this map from the various ways we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. From this model it will become apparent that the purpose of our emotional life is to help us understand our expectations and learn from them. First, I will map out an emotional manifold of basic emotional responses which we navigate and transform. I derive this map from the various ways we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 11:24 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėta 35 eilutė:
''importance of desires - what we wish - Jesus in the Gospel of Mark - wishing that we are one - in the face of our own self-interest, our body's image of desire in terms of personal pleasure - this conflict is the source of morality''
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 11:20 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 7 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will map out an emotional manifold of basic emotional responses which we navigate and transform. I derive this map from the various ways we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
2017 rugsėjo 07 d., 10:47 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 26-27 eilutės:

''Importance of desires: the desire system: the image of what we desire - pleasure - or not - pain: but desire being more than just its image.''
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 23:05 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 52-53 eilutės:

These convert spatal boundary into time.
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 22:28 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 7 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of our emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of an emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 21:34 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 34-40 eilutės:
http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/07-being-one-with.png

What do we truly want? I think that we wish to live one with God and all. We are sad to be one with nobody, surprised to be one with somebody, excited to be one with anybody and happy to be one with everybody. Our emotional responses invite us to get things done with others: when happy - delegate, excited - initiate, surprised - articulate, sad - renew, frightened - confront, disgusted - make ourselves heard, in suspense - exercise sheer will, and at peace - respond. However, our feelings are generally much more complicated and so are our expectations as to who we truly are.

''God goes beyond himself into us - from sadness into contentment. But we are in agitation (because our expectations are not exactly shared) and need to let go and go beyond ourselves into peace beyond us. So happiness has us attach to our life in the world but peace lets us go beyond the world.
Ištrintos 47-50 eilutės:

http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/07-being-one-with.png

What do we truly want? I think that we wish to live one with God and all. We are sad to be one with nobody, surprised to be one with somebody, excited to be one with anybody and happy to be one with everybody. Our emotional responses invite us to get things done with others: when happy - delegate, excited - initiate, surprised - articulate, sad - renew, frightened - confront, disgusted - make ourselves heard, in suspense - exercise sheer will, and at peace - respond. However, our feelings are generally much more complicated and so are our expectations as to who we truly are.
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 21:32 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 35-36 eilutės:

''virtues of not knowing: humor is the hope (overcoming sadness) in not knowing - not knowing is shrinking of knowing''
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 21:29 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 30-34 eilutės:

''expectations about our selves: shame, guilt, pride, reassured''


''shrinking of our self - humor; expansion of our self - empathy''
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 21:21 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 24-25 eilutės:

''Expand with more specific examples.''
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 21:19 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Ištrintos 7-9 eilutės:


Subjectively, we experience moods in seemingly thousands of different shades. Currently, we have no model for describing their variety. I will sketch a research program of our personal moods to identify, reproduce, contrast, transform, interpret and appreciate them so that we might understand and share them just as we do any language.
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 21:19 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 7 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will note, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of our emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will show, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of our emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 21:18 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 7-11 eilutės iš
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will note, with a study of Chinese poems, how we can mull, evoke, reproduce, describe and share all manner of moods and feelings as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of our transformations of our emotional manifold.


į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will note, with a study of Chinese poems, how all manner of moods and feelings can be evoked, reproduced, mulled, described and shared as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of our emotional language which transforms our emotional manifold.
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 21:15 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 7 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will note, with a study of Chinese poems, how we can mull, evoke, reproduce, describe and share all manner of moods and feelings as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of our transformations of our emotional manifold.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions - anger, hate, relief and depression - when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will note, with a study of Chinese poems, how we can mull, evoke, reproduce, describe and share all manner of moods and feelings as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of our transformations of our emotional manifold.
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 21:04 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 7 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will note, with a study of Chinese poems, how we can describe all manner of moods in terms of transformations of the boundary between self and world. Thus I will describe our emotional life as all manner of moods which we experience transformations of an emotional manifold, and which we can mull, evoke, reproduce, describe and share.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will note, with a study of Chinese poems, how we can mull, evoke, reproduce, describe and share all manner of moods and feelings as transformations of the boundary between our self and our world. In summary, I will describe our emotional life as our experience of our transformations of our emotional manifold.
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 21:01 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 7 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will note, with a study of Chinese poems, how we can describe all manner of moods in terms of transformations of the boundary between self and world.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will note, with a study of Chinese poems, how we can describe all manner of moods in terms of transformations of the boundary between self and world. Thus I will describe our emotional life as all manner of moods which we experience transformations of an emotional manifold, and which we can mull, evoke, reproduce, describe and share.
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 20:56 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 7 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations. Next, I will explore what feelings result when we further define our expectations. In particular, we experience unhealthy emotions when we expect what we don't wish. Finally, I will note, with a study of Chinese poems, how we can describe all manner of moods in terms of transformations of the boundary between self and world.
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 20:49 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 7 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I will evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations.
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 20:48 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 7 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I show that can we evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations.
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 20:48 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeista 7 eilutė iš:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings.
į:
I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings. First, I show that can we evoke a set of basic emotional responses by imagining how we experience the consequences of our expectations.
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 20:45 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 6-12 eilutės:

I describe a model of our emotional life which includes an account of moral and social feelings.



2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 15:10 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėta 4 eilutė:
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 15:09 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pakeistos 1-3 eilutės iš
[[http://www.kolpingokolegija.lt/en/2016/08/04/international-scientific-practical-conference-phenomenology-of-practice-in-practice-international-interdisciplinary-conference-of-phenomenological-research/ | Phenomenology of Practice in Practice. International Interdisciplinary Conference of Phenomenological Research]]. September 22-24, 2016.

[++A Research Program for a Taxonomy of Moods
++]
į:
Accepted for [[http://www.flfi.ut.ee/en/conference-emotions | Emotions: Rationality, Morality and Social Understanding]], Tartu, Estonia, September 7-9, 2017.

[++Expecting What We Don't Wish:++]
[++The Source of Anger, Hate, Relief and Depression.
++]
2017 rugsėjo 06 d., 15:08 atliko AndriusKulikauskas -
Pridėtos 1-68 eilutės:
[[http://www.kolpingokolegija.lt/en/2016/08/04/international-scientific-practical-conference-phenomenology-of-practice-in-practice-international-interdisciplinary-conference-of-phenomenological-research/ | Phenomenology of Practice in Practice. International Interdisciplinary Conference of Phenomenological Research]]. September 22-24, 2016.

[++A Research Program for a Taxonomy of Moods++]

Subjectively, we experience moods in seemingly thousands of different shades. Currently, we have no model for describing their variety. I will sketch a research program of our personal moods to identify, reproduce, contrast, transform, interpret and appreciate them so that we might understand and share them just as we do any language.

http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/01-babyemotions.jpg

A first step is to model our most basic emotional responses. I started with six responses which are essentially those which psychologist Paul Ekman found can be observed in the faces of young infants, namely: happiness, sadness, excitement, surprise, fear and disgust. What is the simplest way that I might evoke these responses within myself? I once read that we are struck by existential sadness when our deeply held assumptions turn out to be wrong. So I imagined myself as a child playing with alphabet blocks. I would pick up a block, guess what letter was on the other side, and see if I was right.

http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/02-six-responses.jpg

Suppose I don't know the block very well. If I guess wrong, then I am surprised, but if I guess right, then I am excited. However, if I know the block with absolute certainty, if I can't imagine I could be wrong, if my self and my world depend on that, and yet indeed I am wrong, then I feel devastated, but if I am right, I feel content and assured. And so by such introspection it is clear that our cognition grounds our emotion. A crucial distinction is between that knowledge which we personally identify with, by which we define ourselves, and that knowledge which is more distant, exploratory, theoretical. When I experience the unexpected, then if it comes from beyond, I am frightened, and if it comes from within, I feel disgusted.

http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/03-emotionalresponses.jpg

The structure of this model gives subjective meaning to the facial expressions we observe. It also makes sense of two emotional responses which we can introspect but which we do not and cannot observe, namely peace and suspense. We feel suspense after we have made an expectation and before we know whether it has been met, and we feel peace when we make no expectations. These are responses of not knowing, whereas the other six are for knowing. We see from this model that seeking peace (which has us be sensitive to all emotions) and seeking happiness (by avoiding sadness) are two very different approaches to living.

http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/04-negativemoraltone.jpg

Next, I explain how a moral dimension arises when we make expectations about our expectations, for example, when we judge that our expectations will likely not be met and thus we become anxious that we will be sad. Negative moral tones arise when we expect that which we do not wish. Reflecting on this discord, our suspense becomes anxiety. If our suspicions are confirmed, then we feel hate (rather than sadness) and anger (rather than surprise). If our suspicions are refuted, then we feel relief (rather than excitement) and depression (rather than happiness). We thus find that depression occurs precisely when we could have been happy (because what we wanted to expect actually happened) but instead we feel incapacitated (because we wrongly expected what we did not want).

http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/05-positivemoraltone.png

We feel positive moral tones as the impossibility of negative moral tones. For example, if we only expect what we truly wish for, then we feel love as the impossibility of hate. If we perceive that everything is outside of us, then disgust is impossible, and so we feel beauty. If we perceive that everything is within us, then fright is impossible, and so we feel intimacy. Thus we feel love, beauty and intimacy not as our own emotional responses, but rather as emanating from our environment - loving, beautiful, intimate.

http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/06-HeartWorld.png

Why then do we have feelings and moods? Our moral sense points to the distinction between what we want and what we expect. We don't truly know what we want, what we should want. The truth of the world is that we are here and now in these circumstances, but the truth of the heart is that we don't know why. Yet even so we can formulate expectations that represent our best answer. Our feelings then serve to guide us, do we feel alive or dead? If our expectation is from the depths of our heart, from our spirit of unknowing, then we are sensitive, and otherwise insensitive. When we do the right thing, then we feel good, otherwise bad. And when we reflect, when we are thinking correctly, then we are calm and otherwise riled.

http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/07-being-one-with.png

What do we truly want? I think that we wish to live one with God and all. We are sad to be one with nobody, surprised to be one with somebody, excited to be one with anybody and happy to be one with everybody. Our emotional responses invite us to get things done with others: when happy - delegate, excited - initiate, surprised - articulate, sad - renew, frightened - confront, disgusted - make ourselves heard, in suspense - exercise sheer will, and at peace - respond. However, our feelings are generally much more complicated and so are our expectations as to who we truly are.

http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/08-virtues.png

If we listen to our feelings, then we can grow aware of ourselves and learn that our expectations are not exactly what we want and we can adjust them accordingly. I think that we grow aware of this by stepping into ourselves and stepping out of ourselves. In doing so, we discover our selves to consist of complicated expectations which we have constructed over our lives. They include what we think we know of justice, loyalty and duty. It is vital that we take our principles to heart, internalize them, in which case we sense our own will but also a greater will, beyond our circumstances, I say God's will, with which we align, for we obey not knowing why, we believe not knowing how, we care not knowing what. Upon thus stepping into ourselves, we may sense ourselves surrounded by positive moral tones of love, beauty and intimacy, which are like moods in that they engulf us, and indeed, like canvases for moods because they may last for hours or days, long enough for us to step out of our old expectations. We define ourselves on those canvases in terms of new expectations thanks to the virtues of hope, which looks forward, courage, which holds firm, and honesty, which looks back.

Let us now investigate how our expectations can give rise to thousands of moods. We might study music, dreams, activities, but especially, poetry. Are two people able to interpret a poem in the same way so that it evokes the same mood?

http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/09-Li-Bai.png

Quiet Night Thoughts, by Chinese poet Li Bai of the Tang Dynasty, is a classic poem about his travels far from home.

Beyond the bed - bright moon shines -
I think on the ground is frost.
I raise my head - see bright moon,
I lower my head - think of home.

Note how this poem organizes the spaces for our expectations. The bed is a boundary beyond which we feel the moon is beautiful and the frost is surprising. The poet's neck, which raises and lowers his head, is yet another boundary. The poet thinks of home, which is dear to him, and of itself that surely makes him happy. Yet when he contemplates that his home is so distant, it is sad to think that he is here and not there. Overall, we can specify a mood of conditional sadness, which depends on his reflection on his great distance from his happiness, as measured by the beauty of the moon and the surprise of the frost.

http://www.ms.lt/derlius/Moods/10-Beatles.png

This example suggests that we can specify moods in terms of geometry. In this case, the geometry is simple, like a vector pointing from his head. It could be more sophisticated if he looked back and forth upon himself, as if on a line, extending in two directions. We can add other people with their expectations, which may be parallel or perpendicular, at angles to each other. We might imagine them sweeping out areas or volumes with their changing expectations. Consider the Beatles' song, She Loves You:

You think you've lost your love.
Well, I saw her yesterday.
It's you she's thinking of,
And she told me what to say,
She says she loves you...

The very first line lets us imagine that the boy was happy to be in love, and sad to have lost his love. The singer establishes an intimacy from which he further layers expectations and increases suspense with an intermingling of fright or even disgust: Where did he see her? What does she think of me? What did she tell him to say? The singer frames the boy as depressed, makes him reflect upon himself, and from there reorients him through a dizzy crescendo of feelings: relief, then surprise, then excitement and happiness. If we stop here, then the overall mood is an acceleration into exhilaration. But this could be extended by a sadness that they are not together, or as the song later suggests, complicated by an anger and hatred inasmuch as he came to expect her to leave him, confounded by a depression that he had lost hope, and then perhaps a second anger at her and a third anger at himself that he must now let go of his bad expectations.

By listening to our moods we can tease apart our expectations and transform negative ones into positive ones so that in every way we expect what we truly wish. We grow more sensitive and also our principles prove more sound. Whereas those who escape their moods, for example, by turning to cigarettes, alcohol or drugs, are evidently stunting themselves.

We often don't know why we feel the way we do. It's often not clear if we are responsible for our mood or if it is simply random. Yet it seems healthy to listen to our moods and try to learn from them, to groom our feelings, to tune ourselves like musical instruments. It seems that our unconscious mind challenges our conscious mind by showing what its principles look like under the light of a variety of different moods. This way we don't have to learn everything from experience. This seems to be the purpose of our moods. A Chinese poet's principles may lead him to journey to some distant province and yet his moods may have him question himself.

I invite us to work together to analyze hundreds of poems and discover a geometry of moods.

Naujausi pakeitimai


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Puslapis paskutinį kartą pakeistas 2017 rugsėjo 09 d., 19:59
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